For a city that has seen a staccato of sobriquets over the years, it's time for a new moniker to rein in the new order: Minimum City. Agreed, it's the technological hub of India (or at least it was until a few years ago) and has salubrious climes, but there's something amiss with the ethos of the city that vexes the mind.

Bangalore (now fondly renamed as Bengaluru) used to be called the Pensioner's Paradise until about the early 1990s when a certain Infosys put the city on the international radar. With that came a windfall of investment in the city ushering in leading domestic firms and multinational companies that brought an influx of technical talent from all over the country and in some cases the world. Bangalore, which grew radially in a strictly spatial sense, has not quite been able to cope with this surge of attention. The city is a living example of crumbling infrastructure with epileptic bursts of development often overshadowed by the generally dominant apathy from the government and people alike.

A city is often the reflection of its people. With Bangalore, one sees the inertia in the development of the city as a natural extension of the laidback mindset of its denizens. It's almost as if the tag of Pensioner's Paradise seems too parasitic to shirk off easily. From the work on the international airport to the metro, from perennial under-construction and often undesired flyovers, everything seems to be just meandering along and the worst part is nobody seems to mind or care about it anyway. The story is not any different at the micro-level either -- from unscheduled power cuts to shoddy road works, there is no respite near at hand for the urban dweller.

No talk of Bangalore is complete without a mention of the bad roads here. What may be taken for granted in other cities is a monkey that refuses to get off the back of this city. The apathy vis-a-vis the roadways appalls the concerned citizen; with a city as congested as Bangalore, the least that can be done is ensuring good roads to ease the traveler's woes. Unfortunately, that is amiss as well with potholes dotting all major thoroughfares and excavations carried out by the public works departments on most other roads making a journey through the city a living nightmare. And the pedestrian is not spared either -- with shoddy pavements (if there are any) being regularly encroached upon by the wheeled travelers, a walk through the city is recommended exercise for the reflexes.

Of course, every city has its problems. The difference lies in how it proceeds to tackle them. With Bangalore, the problem seems to be a namby-pamby coalition government that currently rules Karnataka (the state in which Bangalore is located). The political will seems to be directed at resolving party rumblings rather than pursuing developmental activities within the state. The chief minister, H. D. Kumaraswamy, who is from the Janata Dal (Secular) party is more tied up with appeasing members from the BJP (Bharatiya Janata Party), with whom JD-S has an alliance in the state, than interacting with members of society and industry to further the cause of the state. This, combined with a laidback work culture, has ensured a tardy pace of development in most spheres, affecting the economy of Karnataka directly and otherwise.

Comparison with Singapore has been an idee fixe with the people in Bangalore for some time now; this cavalier attitude to the vast chasm that exists between the two cities is laughable to say the least. And unless something radical is implemented with respect to the tiring infrastructure in the city, the future shall continue to look bleak for a city that was once tagged as the Silicon Valley of India.

Source:english.ohmynews
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  • Got an eye on this thread.

    Bubble burst was in talks since past 5 yrs. When will it finally come?
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  • The burst will happen once the population of India goes down by atleast 30% :)!!!
    (India & not just Karnataka, given the influx of immigrants to B'lore from almost every single state in India)
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  • Originally Posted by aviiii
    The burst will happen once the population of India goes down by atleast 30% :)!!!
    (India & not just Karnataka, given the influx of immigrants to B'lore from almost every single state in India)


    As soon as Bangalore stops creating jobs, influx will stop. No executives and no laborers to build their houses.
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  • Originally Posted by aviiii
    The burst will happen once the population of India goes down by atleast 30% :)!!!
    (India & not just Karnataka, given the influx of immigrants to B'lore from almost every single state in India)

    You mean that 30% of the population which lives on less than 21 rupees a day?
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  • Precisely

    Precisely. Think economics.

    Cheap Manual labour has tremendously helped Bangalore's economy. Today more than 95% of labourers working on infra projects such as the Metro, elevated expressways and such highways around Bangalore are seasonal workers looking for that multiple of a Rs 21 or a Rs 32 or whatever the number that planning commissioner (who cannot see the conditions a little over just 50 Kms outside New Delhi) has set.

    Seasonal outsiders such as those easily account for a large portion of that 30%.
    They'll leave once the bubble bursts, but not before their completing their valued contribution towards building Bangalore's economy.

    Try giving them some respect. It helps.
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  • Waiting4Crash,

    Forget cheap construction workers. Consider any profession of your choice in India, including your own. If you think you're being underpaid as compared to the same work-profile globally, you'll find your way to the explanation.

    The only exception I can think of for the above logic is: Indian Politicians!

    Cost of labour is inversely proportional to labour force numbers - which is a direct function of population.

    That said, again, try giving some respect to the cheap construction workers, vegetable vendors, domestic helpers, poor farmers etc that fund your cheap survival.
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  • And how does my being underpaid stop the bubble from bursting? I thought, my lower pay (as compared to global counterparts) should make it burst.
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