Hi Friends,

I had been to the FAIRPRO '09 Fair.My Impression after seeing, is that prices are stagnating for all ongoing projects and builders are trying hard to hold them up.

Prices are 10-20% lower for new projects in the pipeline and for ready to occupy flats.

The discount offered at the stall was very less and were in the range 150-500 Rs/sqft max.

For the benefit of fellow members I am posting the project/price details of some of the properties.



Akshaya Foundations

Adora - OMR - 3750/sqft
Aikya - Adyar - 12500/sqft

Alliance Group - Orchid Springs - 3199/sqft

Arihant Foundations

Heirloom - Thalumbur - 2499/sqft
Escapade - Thoraipakkam - 4150/sqft
Villa Viviana - Maramalai nagar - starting from 1 Crore

Asvini Foundations

Amarisa-phase1 - Ramapuram - 4500/sqft
Amarisa-phase2 - Ramapuram - 4250/sqft
Akshita - Madipakkam - 3800/sqft

Casa Grande

Riveira - Palikkarnai - 3450/sqft - before discount 3600/sqft
Silver Oak - Perungudi - 4300/sqft - before discount 4500/sqft
Madhuban - Madipakkam - 3300 /sqft - before discount 3500/sqft
Mylapore - R.K.salai - 12500/sqft
Plots
Ponmar -785/sqft - before discount 825/sqft
Maraimalainagar - 790/sqft - before discount 825/sqft

CeeDeeyes - Chenni Pattinam

Basic Rate - 1600/sqft All Inclusive - 2075/sqft

Chaitanya shanthiniketan

Sunnyvale - Ayanavaram - 4850/sqft
Serena - Rajkilpakkam - 2550/sqft
Gardenia - OMR - 1900/sqft
Green Park - Chitlapakkam - 3300/sqft

DLF

Gardencity - 3200/sqft - was told slash in prices expected in coming weeks.

Doshi Housing

Etopia I and II - Perungudi - 3895/sqft
Nakshatra - Tambaram - 2995/sqft - Completion May 2010
Tranquil - Velachery - 5500/sqft - Completion February 2010
Trinity park - Santhoshpuram,Vengaivasal - 3195/sqft - Completion April 2009
Serene Couny-Villas - Santhoshpuram,Vengaivasal - 2200,2600/sqft
LlanStephan - Chetpet - 9000/sqft - Completion May 2009
Sri Mahalakshmi - Ayanavaram - 4495/sqft - Ready to Occupy

ETA

Rosedale - OMR - 3100/sqft
Le Chalet - Villas - Sriperambudhur - 26 Lakhs - 37 Lakhs

Hiranandani Upscale - 4200/sqft

Hiranandani Palace Gardens - 3475/sqft

Indus Housing

anantya - Navalur,OMR - 2299/sqft + 400(other charges)
riviera villa - Navalur,OMR - 90 Lakhs onwards
habittera - urapakkam,GST - 2399/sqft + 400(other charges)
amber - Saidapet - 4750/sqft

Jain Housing

Ankush Prakas - Kilpauk - 7500/sqft - Ready to occupy
Amrit Kailash - Strahns Road - 4500/sqft - Ready to occupy
La Gardenia - Nungabakkam - 7500/sqft - Ready to occupy
Ansruta - Valluvarkottam, nungabakkam - 10000/sqft - Ready to occupy
Antariska - Kodambakkam - 4500/sqft - Ready to occupy
Eiffel Garden - Vadapalani - 4250/sqft - Ready to occupy
Saagarika - M.R.C Nagar, sea facing - 10000/12500 - Ready to occupy
Green acres - Pallavaram - 3900/sqft - Ready to occupy
Abhishek - Selaiyur - 3500/sqft - Ready to occupy.

Jamals

Orchid - Palikkarnai - 3500/sqft
Palazzo - keelkattalai - 3700/sqft
Grandeur - Velappanchavadi(near saveetha dental college) - 3200/sqft

KGEYES

3 Projects on L.B.Road, Thiruvanmiyur - 6650/sqft
Delmare - Beach road,Thiruvanmiyur - 7000/sqft
Carolina - Velachery,Taramani - 4500/sqft
Swathi - Sastri Nagar,Adyar - 8500/sqft
Kalakshetra - 8000/sqft

Landmark Constructions

Tiara - Perungudi - 4000/sqft - Completion on August 2009
Aston Ville - Vadapalani - 5500 sqft - Completion on July 2009
Tudors Place - K.K.Nagar - 6500/sqft
The Address - Adyar - 11500/sqft
The Grange - Palavakkam - 7500/sqft
Cenralia - Chrompet - 2950/sqft - prelaunch
Gem Towers - AnnaNagar - To be launched.
Mahalakshmi Heights - Ashok Nagar - To be launched

L&T Estancia
Construction in Progress
1st-3rd Floor - 3950/sqft
4th -12 floor - floor rise charge of 20/sqft for each floor
13th - 17th - 4450/qft

L&T Eden Park - 3600/sqft

Mantri Synergy - OMR
2800/sqft - with 20/floor rise
Special offer - First Floor - all inclusive
1140 sqft - 33,67,000
870 sqft - 28,50,000

Navin Housing

Dayton Heights - Nelson Manickam road - 6500/sqft + 30/sqft floor rise from 2nd floor
Subha Mangala - Ramapuram - 4200/sqft
Brookfield - Nanmangalam - 3500/sqft
Merrylands - Medavakkam - 3500/sqft

Olympia Opaline - 3441/sqft - spl budget flats available

PACE Builders

Anna nagar west - 4195/sqft - before discount 4495/sqft
Selaiyur - 3195/sqft - before discount 3495/sqft
Valasarvakkam - 2795/sqft - before discount 3295/sqft

PS Srijan

The Grand - Velachery - 5250 sqft - before discount 5500/sqft - Floor Rise applicable from 4th floor

Rajparis

Harmony - Medavakkam - 3100/sqft

Rajarathnam Constructions

RC Prince Gardenia - Perambur redhill road,Kolathur - 3600/sqft

Rajkham

Independant houses - Ayyapathangal - 2600/sqft

Real Value

Sai Skanda - Velachery - 4200/sqft
Sai Surya - Palikaranai - 3800/sqft
OMR opp SIPCOT - 13.20 Lakhs onwards

Shriram Properties

Trishakti - SIPCOT - 2750/sqft
Shankari - 1990/sqft

Sidharth foundations

Tulip - k.k.nagar west - 4800/sqft - completion march 2009
Natura - medavakkam - 3100 /sqft - completion july 2009
Visvaleela - Annanagar - 8500 /sqft - to be launched
Dakshin - Urapakkam - price TBD - to be launched
upcoming projects in porur, thoraipakkam, rajkeelpakkam, mogappair.

SIS

Safaa - Urappakam - 3150/sqft

SSPDL

Crescent - Kelambakkam - Vandalur Road - 2500/sqft
Upcoming 2 villa project one in OMR and one in Sriperambathur.

Sumanth & Co

Thiruvanmiyur - 6000/sqft
Besant Nagar - 11500/sqft

TVH

Lumbini square - Pursaiwalkam - 5500/sqft + 30/sqft floor rise from 5th floor
Ouranya Bay(Premium) - OMR,Padur - 3100,3200 + 25/sqft floor rise from 5th floor
Ouranya Bay(Budget) - 2bhk - 20 Lakhs
3bhk - 30 Lakhs
Ekanta - Coimbatore - 3100/sqft
Revata - Mogappair east - 4500/sqft
Kamya - K.K,Nagar - 7000/sqft
Metro Golden Nest - Sriperambathur - 1bhk - 15 Lakhs
2bhk - 22 Lakhs
3bhk - 28 Lakhs

VGN Group

Minerva - Mogappair,Nolumbur - 2975/sqft
3 in 1, 4 in 1 - 3800/sqft
Mahalakshmi Nagar,Thiruverkadu - 3500/sqft
Plots
Mugalivakkam - 52 Lakhs/grnd
Selaiyur - 50 Lakhs/grnd
SPKoil - 34 Lakhs/grnd
Katankulathur - 22-27 Lakhs/grnd

Yuga Homes

Shem Park - chemmenachery - 3300/sqft
Upcoming in Koyambedu, R.A.Puram(8000/sqft)



There are lots of properties and also lots of potential buyers.There is sure a sense of uncertainity among the builders and also the buyers on when to make the next move.It was evident that correction in RE prices have started to happen.

Requesting members to respond with their thoughts on the current trend.
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  • For genuine reasons Tamil as a language is entirely different among other languages in India. When Punjabis, Gujarathis, Biharis, Marathis speak Hindi, appreciate that they are speaking one of our other national language(apart from their Mother tongue) which is common across India. However on a neutral basis one should appreciate the fact that it is relatively easy for them because by and large they are all smililar to Hindi unlike Tamil.

    Most natives in chennai dont expect the outsiders to speak Tamil, because they do understand it is difficult for someone new to pick Tamil so easily.As VP pointed out this is one of the reasons even as customers in restaurant they move on with waiters who doesnt know Tamil (it is not because they behave rough). After all they are very much aware how difficult it is for themselves to pick Hindi. Outsiders should realise this fact and move on.

    in General, if you are an outsider in any state, the best thing is to learn the local language so it makes your life easy and earns you respect. if UP guy is in TN or TN guy is in UP it is going to take longer to learn the local languages as it is completely different for them. In the process if someone is not strong they will give up, whats wrong in it after all they are unable to pick up a new language. Most people who will give up are the ones who know English for obvious reasons.

    i have to mention one of my experiance in Chennai, when i found a very hard working Bihari boy around 18 years of age was speaking good Tamil. Caught with surprise and with a lot of respect had a brief conversation with him, 18 years of age he was earning 35K monthly working for a restaurant and he had not been to school after 4th grade! Many entry level engineering/SW jobs dont pay 35K. i will bet no tamil boy or any other bihari boy would be paid that high in the same restaurant. the reason he is paid that high is just not only his excellent hardwork but his commitment to learn and speak local language.

    His stay and food are free, his savings % is just not imaginable. He did mentioned that running a restaurant on his own is his aim. He is not willing to work under a agency as they eat lot of money from restaurant owners and pay peanuts to labours. As he is pretty good with the language, he was able to find a direct job. i had to force him to take a tip from me. porabably he is an outlier, 1 in 10 thousand guy but he was amazing to me.

    i have said this story to my 5 year old son as a bed time story n number of times, when i finish the story i use to tell him wherever you live make sure you can speak the local language that is a better edge to have rather a qualifying degree. I am glad that his favourite (Robo, Sivaji, Linga) Superstar is a great example to quote.
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  • Ice,

    I agree most of the poor low level migrants from Bihar, Orrisa & Bengal are hard working and quickly adapt to the new language & culture.

    The issue of arrogance, prejudice and not accepting diversity is the "educated" Hindi belt migrant workers (U.P,MP, Utharkand,Delhi,Hariyana,Chandigarh etc). who demand everyone in TN should change to make them feel at home.

    Usually you don't see that kind arrogance & prejudice with professional workers from other South Indian States or Maraties or Bengalis.
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  • Originally Posted by Economist
    @Lookout have you considered what will be the situation of a Non-Hindi speaking Tamil guy who is transferred to Delhi or Calcutta?
    How will he communicate to taxiwala, plumber, mechanic or Domestic help?

    Wouldn't you rightfully say he better learn functional Hindi or Bengali?

    Why should it be any different in your situation?


    I have learnt functional Tamil. It helps. The first phrase I picked up in my first week was how to say 'too high/much' to the auto guy - "rumba jyasti" :)

    By no means I say that non-hindi speaking Tamil guys do not have it tough in Delhi or Calcutta. But that is the whole point. Because there is a larger group of diverse people who speak Hindi and allied languages, places like Delhi and Calcutta are considered cosmo.

    Tamil is an important cultural marker of a large group of people, but it is after all one state. When 80% of the country understands one language, it will make more practical sense for that 20% to adapt. And they are adapting from what I see around me, but still not enough to make non-Southerners feel at home.
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  • Originally Posted by Lookout
    I have learnt functional Tamil. It helps. The first phrase I picked up in my first week was how to say 'too high/much' to the auto guy - "rumba jyasti" :)

    By no means I say that non-hindi speaking Tamil guys do not have it tough in Delhi or Calcutta. But that is the whole point. Because there is a larger group of diverse people who speak Hindi and allied languages, places like Delhi and Calcutta are considered cosmo.

    Tamil is an important cultural marker of a large group of people, but it is after all one state. When 80% of the country understands one language, it will make more practical sense for that 20% to adapt. And they are adapting from what I see around me, but still not enough to make non-Southerners feel at home.


    How do you know there are 80% population knows Hindi. Provide the proof. My knowledge is only 40% of the Indians knows Hindi.
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  • Originally Posted by arvbin
    How do you know there are 80% population knows Hindi. Provide the proof. My knowledge is only 40% of the Indians knows Hindi.


    As accused, it was an assumption. I went with Hindi-derived or Hindi-allied languages. The most populous states like UP, Bihar, Orissa, Bengal, Raj, Maha, Guj and other smaller northern ones where people have a working knowledge of Hindi.
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  • Originally Posted by arvbin
    How do you know there are 80% population knows Hindi. Provide the proof. My knowledge is only 40% of the Indians knows Hindi.


    Any proof for 40% either?

    I think we got to stop this bashing Hindi or Tamil. Learning another language is always better if possible.
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  • Originally Posted by Economist
    Ice,

    I agree most of the poor low level migrants from Bihar, Orrisa & Bengal are hard working and quickly adapt to the new language & culture.

    The issue of arrogance, prejudice and not accepting diversity is the "educated" Hindi belt migrant workers (U.P,MP, Utharkand,Delhi,Hariyana,Chandigarh etc). who demand everyone in TN should change to make them feel at home.

    Usually you don't see that kind arrogance & prejudice with professional workers from other South Indian States or Maraties or Bengalis.


    In the last few years, almost all the North Indians I have to deal with in Chennai asked me "why Tamils don't speak Hindi, even though it is the national language". I thought they are ignorant and tried to explain that there is no national language in India and Hindi is just one among the many official languages India have. But they never accept but will argue endlessly on why we have to learn Hindi.

    Later I realized that it is not they are the ignorant but it is me. By continuously repeating Hindi as a national language, they are trying to create an illusion / status-quo that Hindi is the national language ( like how BJP ministers is doing this tactics in various issues including hindi issue). Nowadays if someone asks anything in Hindi ( I don't know Hindi ), I used to tell in Tamil some random stuff like "Poi oru 100 peru kitta kelunga, yarkavathu neengal pesara language purincha reply pannuvanga" and walk away.
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  • Originally Posted by sunr2i
    Any proof for 40% either?

    I think we got to stop this bashing Hindi or Tamil. Learning another language is always better if possible.


    1. The one who makes a claim has to give proof first. Not the one who counter.
    2. According to census 2001, roughly 41% of our population was hindi speaking. That's about 1.5% increase from census 1991 data. 2011 demographics not published yet, it is expected to be 1% increase. Learn to use google and find the census data.
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  • Originally Posted by sunr2i


    Learning another language is always better if possible.


    Yes, learning another language is good, thats why we learning English - the world language. People will do, learn things if they wish or situation demands. Won't do something to please others.

    What is the point of learning Hindi, if I have to work next 5 years in Hyderabad or Vijayawada? Maids, vendors and other common people there mostly knows only Telegu or some broken English. I will learn Telegu if I decided to move to Andhra / Telengana & yes, will learn Hindi if I have to move to Hindi speaking state.
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  • Lookout this is a conversation between a Hindi speaker & a Tamil speaker:

    Question by Mr. K. Agarwal:

    I am really perturbed to see so many articles written in your magazine against Hindi as India's official language. I pity people having such a weird thinking. They should realize that more languages a person knows broader his outlook becomes. I do not know why people from other southern states have no problem with Hindi except people from Tamilnadu. No doubt Tamil Nadu politicians are responsible for inciting this hatred.

    In India it must be made compulsory for people to learn at least three languages.

    1. Local language of the place you are living
    2. Hindi (national language)
    3. English (international language)

    Many of my Tamil friends feel bad that they cannot speak Hindi. They say that it was difficult to learn Hindi in Tamil. They regret it because if they do not know Hindi or English, life becomes difficult whenever they travel outside of Tamil Nadu. In India only a few people know English whereas Hindi is spoken by more than 50%. I have seen people speaking five or six languages fluently. I do not think anybody would become less of a Tamilian by learning Hindi. Being proud of ones own heritage does not stop you from learning other languages. The earlier we realize this the better it is.

    Hope you will take in good sense and do not publish article from such fanatic people in your magazine.

    Response (by Thanjai Nalankilli)

    1) K. Agarwal: "More languages a person knows, broader his outlook becomes".

    Thanjai Nalankilli: True, but it need not have to be Hindi. We will decide what languages we want to learn. Some people may be happy with two languages--Tamil and English. Some may want to learn Malay because they may want to work in Malaysia. Some may want to learn Arabic because they want to work in Arab countries. Some may want to learn Hindi because they want to work in Hindi states. Some may want to learn Bengali or French or Chinese for the pure pleasure of it. It is up to the individual. We are not opposed to anyone learning Hindi voluntarily but we do not want it imposed on us directly or indirectly.

    May I suggest that you preach what you preach us to fellow Hindi speakers? Why don't your fellow Hindi speakers learn more languages? We are not asking them to learn five or six languages (which you seem to think is a good idea), not even three languages that you want non-Hindi peoples to learn compulsorily, just one more language other than Hindi. Let Hindi speakers learn English, then we can all communicate in English. Where is the need for Hindi? What you want is for everyone to learn Hindi (as a compulsory third language) and talk to you in your language while Hindi speakers will not even learn a second language English. It is not acceptable to the people of Tamil Nadu.

    2) K. Agarwal: "I do not know why people from other southern states have no problem with Hindi except people from Tamilnadu."

    Thanjai Nalankilli: I am not so sure if people from other southern states have accepted Hindi. If, in fact, they have, more power to you. It makes implementation of Hindi as India's official language easy. Let Tamil Nadu become an independent country and you can do all your business in Hindi throughout India without interference from Tamil Nadu.

    3) K. Agarwal: " No doubt Tamil Nadu politicians are responsible for inciting this hatred."

    Thanjai Nalankilli: Let me make it clear that we do not hate Hindi but we hate making Hindi the official language of India. You can bury your head in the sand and hold on to your belief that it is the Tamil politicians who oppose Hindi imposition or started the opposition. President of the first organization in Tamilnadu against Hindi imposition (1938), the "Anti-Hindi Command", was Somasundara Bharathiyar. He was not a politician contesting any election or planning to contest any election. The very first Anti-Hindi Conference held at Kodampakkam, Chennai (Madras) in 1938 was presided by the great Saivaite scholar Maraimalai Adikalar (Marai Malai Adigalar); he was not a politician either. Here are some numbers you may want to know.

    Number of people participating in the very first Anti-Hindi March from Thiruchirapalli (Tiruchi, Trichi) to Chennai (Madras) in 1938 was over four times as those who participated in Mahatma Gandhi's Dhandi March. Dhandi march is depicted as a great march in Indian history. Surely it is a great march but the Anti-Hindi march attracted four times as many people. Such large numbers of people do not participate in marches unless there is popular discontent with Hindi imposition. By the way, I do not hear anyone saying that politicians like Nehru were responsible for inciting hatred against British rule because they wanted to become Prime Minister. Then why do some Hindi people say that politicians like Annadurai and Karunanidhi incited anti-Hindi imposition agitations to gain political power?

    I will just give one more statistic. If you add all the people who participated in demonstrations against British rule in Tamil Nadu during all those years of British rule, they would be less than those who demonstrated against Hindi imposition on January 25, 1965.Please read Reference 1, if you wish to know more about anti-Hindi imposition agitations in Tamilnadu.


    4) K. Agarwal: "Many of my Tamil friends feel bad that they cannot speak Hindi."

    Thanjai Nalankilli: If those friends are living in Hindi states for some time and have not yet learned Hindi, they should. If they are living in Tamil Nadu and feel bad that they do not know Hindi, these people have low self-esteem. I have nothing else to say about them. By the way, do you or any of your Hindi friends living in Hindi states feel bad that you do not know Tamil or Telugu or Bengali?


    5) K. Agarwal: "I do not think anybody would become less of a Tamilian by learning Hindi."

    Thanjai Nalankilli: I do not think that you and other Hindi speakers would become any less of a 'Hindian' by learning Tamil. Why don't you all learn Tamil compulsory in school and communicate with us in Tamil. What is good for the goose is good for the gander too!


    6) K. Agarwal: "In India only a few people know English whereas Hindi is spoken by more than 50%."

    Thanjai Nalankilli: I do not agree with the 50% figure. It is about 30% if you consider Mythili as Hindi too. Irrespective of whether it is 30% or 50%, may I ask that these Hindi speakers take your advice to heart and learn at least a second language, English? Then Hindis and Tamils can communicate in English instead of a third language (Hindi) thrust into Tamil throats through Indian government Hindi imposition. (I am referring to your advice that people should learn more languages because "more languages a person knows broader his outlook becomes". Also your statement, "Being proud of ones own heritage does not stop you from learning other languages." So learn English and speak to us in English.)

    Thanjai Nalankilli: I do not agree with the 50% figure. It is about 30% if you consider Mythili as Hindi too. Irrespective of whether it is 30% or 50%, may I ask that these Hindi speakers take your advice to heart and learn at least a second language, English? Then Hindis and Tamils can communicate in English instead of a third language (Hindi) thrust into Tamil throats through Indian government Hindi imposition. (I am referring to your advice that people should learn more languages because "more languages a person knows broader his outlook becomes". Also your statement, "Being proud of ones own heritage does not stop you from learning other languages." So learn English and speak to us in English.)

    Thanjai Nalankilli: I do not agree with the 50% figure. It is about 30% if you consider Mythili as Hindi too. Irrespective of whether it is 30% or 50%, may I ask that these Hindi speakers take your advice to heart and learn at least a second language, English? Then Hindis and Tamils can communicate in English instead of a third language (Hindi) thrust into Tamil throats through Indian government Hindi imposition. (I am referring to your advice that people should learn more languages because "more languages a person knows broader his outlook becomes". Also your statement, "Being proud of ones own heritage does not stop you from learning other languages." So learn English and speak to us in English.)
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  • Originally Posted by Lookout

    Tamil is an important cultural marker of a large group of people, but it is after all one state. When 80% of the country understands one language, it will make more practical sense for that 20% to adapt. And they are adapting from what I see around me, but still not enough to make non-Southerners feel at home.




    Why should others have to bend over backwards and learn a completely new language to make non- Southeners "feel at home"?

    This "I have to feel at home" attitude is what creating this problems.

    Tamilnadu has heaps of Telugu and Malayalee people should Tamils also need to learn their language to make them "feel at home"

    Next thing one would say Chennai people should learn Korean & Japanese as most expat from those 2 countries are highest in Chennai.

    @Lookout - no one is stopping any one from learning Hindi if they want, we just don't like the expectation from Hindi state guys that everyone they come across should know Hindi.

    If a Tamilian has a need or wish to learn a language (including Hindi) he should learn it.

    But you can't expect Cleaner Aaya, Auto Kumar ,60 year old Landlord Mami to learn and speak to you in Hindi. If they have a desperate need they will learn. It is their choice.

    Please don't force the ones who does not have the need or wish just because you can feel "at home"

    BTW - Tamilnadu has been one of top performing state & Chennai has been one of Top performing city in India since Indipendence - All this with over 98% of the population not knowing Hindi.

    I don't have tell you about the performance of Hindi belt in the feild of Industrial development or human development.

    Note: My mother tongue is Telugu not Tamil.
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  • I disagree with a post that assumes auto, mechanics, plumbers etc to be more cunning and 'scammy' in Chennai. I think most businessmen (small and big!) everywhere are out to rip you off and wait for you to smarten up. I am a Sikh and I have been quoted the most atrocious fares by Sikh drivers auto/taxi drivers at Delhi Railway station. They even try and speak in proper Punjabi to lure a guy seemingly not from Delhi. :)

    I do think the people here are more soft spoken though (auto guys are an exception!). They may have the same motives, schemes as everyone else but just that outward rudeness you often encounter on streets of Delhi/Gurgaon is not present.

    To me the biggest positive of Chennai is women safety and the general peaceful nature of the society.
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  • Originally Posted by Economist
    Why should others have to bend over backwards and learn a completely new language to make non- Southeners "feel at home"?

    This "I have to feel at home" attitude is what creating this problems.

    Tamilnadu has heaps of Telugu and Malayalee people should Tamils also need to learn their language to make them "feel at home"

    Next thing one would say Chennai people should learn Korean & Japanese as most expat from those 2 countries are highest in Chennai.

    @Lookout - no one is stopping any one from learning Hindi if they want, we just don't like the expectation from Hindi state guys that everyone they come across should know Hindi.

    If a Tamilian has a need or wish to learn a language (including Hindi) he should learn it.

    But you can't expect Cleaner Aaya, Auto Kumar ,60 year old Landlord Mami to learn and speak to you in Hindi. If they have a desperate need they will learn. It is their choice.

    Please don't force the ones who does not have the need or wish just because you can feel "at home"

    BTW - Tamilnadu has been one of top performing state & Chennai has been one of Top performing city in India since Indipendence - All this with over 98% of the population not knowing Hindi.

    I don't have tell you about the performance of Hindi belt in the feild of Industrial development or human development.

    Note: My mother tongue is Telugu not Tamil.


    Just my opinion, Economist.

    I don't expect the cleaner and auto guy to learn Hindi. I was just stating what many North Indians encounter when they come here. Yes, I agree its unfair of them to expect the locals to change. But I said it will be more feasible for Hindi to propagate in Tamil society rather than the other way round because of the sheer numbers difference. And if you'd remember, we started off by discussing about what makes a cosmopolitan city - hence my thoughts on that topic.

    I do think you are viewing my posts with the wrong lenses.
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  • Originally Posted by Lookout
    And they are adapting from what I see around me, but still not enough to make non-Southerners feel at home.


    Learn Tamil and feel at home. If you find tamil is difficult, we accept. You should realize that Hindi is difficult for Tamils, in general one doesn't undergo a difficult learning unless there is a need.

    In my personal opinion Hindi is a mix of Sanskrit, Urdu, Arabic etc. nothin wrong in it India had Mughals for a long time. Non of these had strong presence in tamilnadu. Naturally there was nothing for Tamils to learn Hindi.

    On the other end tamil is enjoyed and worshipped here because of its nature and originality, heritage. It is the oldest of indian languages in practice and doesn't have a Sanskrit root. Tamil has it's own root and has survived centuries and more. This fact is hid by politicians in north India who try to impose Hindi. Read more and try to understand why Hindi is not accepted naturally in TN unlike other states. If you don't, that is ok but realize there are good natural reasons why Hindi is not common in TN.
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  • Originally Posted by iceemani
    Learn Tamil and feel at home. If you find tamil is difficult, we accept. You should realize that Hindi is difficult for Tamils, in general one doesn't undergo a difficult learning unless there is a need.

    In my personal opinion Hindi is a mix of Sanskrit, Urdu, Arabic etc. nothin wrong in it India had Mughals for a long time. Non of these had strong presence in tamilnadu. Naturally there was nothing for Tamils to learn Hindi.

    On the other end tamil is enjoyed and worshipped here because of its nature and originality, heritage. It is the oldest of indian languages in practice and doesn't have a Sanskrit root. Tamil has it's own root and has survived centuries and more. This fact is hid by politicians in north India who try to impose Hindi. Read more and try to understand why Hindi is not accepted naturally in TN unlike other states. If you don't, that is ok but realize there are good natural reasons why Hindi is not common in TN.


    I agree, Mani. I have picked up rudimentary Tamil to make do. And yes, its totally understandable why Tamil and Hindi are so different even though I hear some Tamil with incorporated Sanskrit words.

    And yes, Hindi is not the official language. Its the most commonly spoken language and I was coming from that perspective.
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