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Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

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  • Re : Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

    Govt shelter home for girls undergoing transformation

    Manka Behl| TNN | Jun 25, 2018, 04:58 IST An initiative taken by city-based NGO Zero Gravity has not just brought colours to the unplastered walls of th... Read More

    Nagpur: Kiran never had a home to call her own, but she would always find a dark corner for herself. Whether it was at the mental asylum or the orphanage, the bouts of schizophrenia, which not everyone could tolerate, would send her into social isolation.

    The temporary recourse found in being separated from the others wouldn’t last long. The fears, delusions and hallucinations would often push 17-year-old Kiran to attempt self-harm.

    That same Kiran, who all these years would blankly see through people, today greets us with a bright-eyed smile at the girls’ shelter home run by the district women and child development department at Katol Square.

    A paintbrush, a colour palette and an empty wall was all that was needed to bring about the sea change. An initiative taken by city-based NGO Zero Gravity has not just brought colours to the unplastered walls of the shelter but also to the lives of its around 100 inmates who, like Kiran and the walls, have now changed beyond recognition.

    “Water drips on their beds, there is no place to study, the toilets are broken, and it smells so bad that I couldn’t stand here for two minutes. I wonder how they live here.” This is how some guests described the shelter, which goes by the official name of Shaskiya Mulinche Balgruha, a few months back.

    Started around 1963, the shelter houses girls aged 6-18 years, who are orphans, rendered homeless due to family discord, crime, violence or are street beggars. This is the same place from where three minor girls had fled last year and one of them gang raped by six men a day after the escape.

    Coming from all kinds of backgrounds — abusive father, single parent, abandoned, orphans, ragpickers, beggars — most of the girls had a destructive mentality, says Maitreyi Jichkar, founder of Zero Gravity. “They are not living here because they want to but because they have to. We thought that if we turn the dilapidated shelter into a beautiful home, cases of girls running away would come down,” she adds.

    Before starting the work, the group had researched on impact of living conditions on the psychology of kids. “We learnt that poor housing conditions have a damaging impact on child’s learning and can also contribute to the emergence of problem behaviour. It can have a long-term impact on health as children living in over-crowded conditions are 10 times more likely to contract meningitis,” says Jichkar.

    For mending the impressionable minds of these girls, there was thus a lot of mending needed in the infrastructure. There were not enough lights or fans, the roofs were leaking, not enough beds to sleep, no place to store clothes and other essentials, and very unhygienic rooms and toilets.

    The right portion of the shelter is pretty much the same. The dormitories are dark and dirty, walls look ready to collapse, the entire stretch of corridor has an unbearable stench. But the left portion looks as if it has been transplanted from Alice’s Wonderland. It’s an open sesame to an ideal living and learning space, has bright-coloured walls with hand-painted birds, trees, angel wings and flowers.

    “These help in enhancing the visual learning of young girls. Healthy living environment also controls aggression and hyperactive behaviour,” says the project’s architect Samruddhi Chaphale.

    10-year-old Kritika gently pulls your hand and takes you to the other side of the lobby. She shows you a colourful sketch of the Eiffel Tower which “she wants to climb one day”. Brought to the shelter a few months back, Kritika is a ragpicker’s daughter and would sleep on the streets near Santra Market. Her mother left her here so that Kritika could get a roof and food.

    Though she would be withdrawn when the volunteers started working on the shelter from April 27, Kritika soon expressed her desire to help them paint the beds. “Kritika soon opened up to us and confided how she would sometimes steal stuff from a mall,” says Jichkar.

    Kritika is not the only one who shared the skeleton in her closet. “Since the last one month, we are everywhere — in their rooms, toilets, dining area, courtyard trying to beautify every nook and corner. Though initially the girls would just observe us from a distance, they soon realized we were not there to lecture them on good manners and offered to help us,” says project manager Tanushree Tamaskar.

    Much to the volunteers’ amazement, almost all the girls joined them in the make over of the shelter. Every inch of a pale white wall, which was reserved by the inmates as their “private canvas”, is today covered with their favourite Disney characters, birds, animals and abstracts.

    The girls, who had nothing much to do in the four walls of the shelter apart from plotting ways to run away, finally found a purpose. “It seemed as if with every stroke of the brush they were releasing all their negative emotions,” says project’s creative director Shruti Rathod.

    As the inmates are actively involved in the revamping, a sense of ownership is clearly prevailing. The same girls who would litter around the shelter, scribble on the walls and not flush the toilets, are now scolding labourers for dirtying a newly painted wall.

    A lot of work is still to be done. The NGO is raising funds through crowdfunding platform Ketto. “We have managed to raise Rs1.58 lakh but our target is Rs7 lakh which includes all the repairs and maintenance work,” says Jichkar, who plans to develop a dining and study area, a recreational centre and also fix up the courtyard where inmates spend a lot of their time.

    Generous donors from all over the country are helping the cause. “One day, a donor donated 20 fans which came as a blessing for the girls who would otherwise sleep in the heat,” says Jichkar.

    The volunteers have managed to turn the shelter into a beautiful home. They have made a bigger difference in the mental health of the inmates. “The initiative had a very positive impact on their minds. They listen to the volunteers, work with dedication, dance and dream big,” says Anjali Nimbalkar, superintendent of the shelter.

    Now, when they have a healthy environment to live in, running away is not even a fleeting thought. Some weeks back, three girls, who must be six-to-seven years old, were picked up by the police when they were begging at a traffic signal. The day they were brought to the shelter, they tried to escape. “We opened the gate for some labourers when we saw them all geared up ready to run outside. We got them inside and started involving them in different works,” says Jichkar.

    When TOI met them, they were happily learning dance steps from the volunteers. “I want to become a singer and a dancer,” one of them says.

    “Earlier, we would want to escape because we thought that sleeping on footpaths is better than sleeping here. But now, we are living in beautiful rooms which we would see only on television,” says 17-year-old Radha, who was left at the shelter as her mother, being a single parent, was unable to take care of her.

    While spending time with the volunteers, Radha discovered a knack for photography and now uses an old professional camera. “We were surprised to see how naturally photography comes to her,” the volunteers say.

    Their efforts have inspired another teenager to make a career in social work. When Swati’s mother died, her father chose to keep her brother and abandoned her. “I will be enrolling for a course in social work and will join Zero Gravity,” she says confidently.

    Recently, the volunteers introduced the girls to waste segregation and, now, they have started disposing wet and dry waste in different dustbins. “We are teaching them to make a compost pit from the wet waste. Soon, we will be introducing them to gardening hoping it would bring more behavioural changes,” says Jichkar.

    Agrees clinical psychologist Sonam Kapoor who has worked with Childline India. “Many inmates come from a place where they have seen destruction and they often tend to replicate it in their behaviour by harming others or refusing to cooperate. Activities like gardening or petting an animal can be a big stress-buster and help them in understanding love, care and kindness,” she says.

    Probably, it was the void of such emotions that the volunteers managed to fill. “Didis here have told us stories of girls who are pursuing different careers. There was a time when we didn’t have enough clothes to cover our body but today we are imagining ourselves in uniforms,” says 17-year-old Bharti.

    ‘What good are winds without the courage to fly’ reads a graffiti near the bed on which Bharti is preparing for railway recruitment.

    What is Zero Gravity?

    Zero Gravity is a non-profit organization operating under the umbrella of Dr Shrikant Jichkar Foundation. Founded by Maitreyi Jichkar in 2008, the young group has been working in the field of education, health care and rural development since a decade. However, it was the ‘Happy School Project’ started six years back which turned out to be their “star” project. “Under this, we transform government schools through holistic infrastructural makeovers using UNICEF’s concept of Building As A Learning Aid (BALA),” she says.

    Till now, the organization has transformed 50 schools in three states, impacting the lives of more than 5,000 children. In 2013, Zero Gravity had collaborated with The Times of India in the Save Nag River campaign.

    The NGO is currently taking institutional care of 500 children living in shelter homes. The government girls shelter home at Katol Road is the group's first project under its mission of transforming shelters.

    A coffee fund-raiser

    In an innovate approach, coffee became a medium to raise funds for the shelter’s transformation. On Saturday and Sunday, Zero Gravity collaborated with Corridor Seven Coffee Roasters and organized a coffee fund-raiser called ‘Brewing for Renewing’. Held inside the shelter premises, the fund-raiser saw participation of around 650 people and managed to raise about Rs1.10 lakh.

    “This was a first-of-its kind fund-raiser in the city in which we turned the shelter’s courtyard into a café. A major part of the coffee bills is going to be used for rebuilding the shelter,” said coffee ‘Q grader’ Mithilesh Wazalwar, who has founded Corridor Seven.

    On the first day itself, the expenses for electrical work in the dormitories were taken care of. “Around 200 people attended the fund-raiser and around Rs10,000 was collected,” said Zero Gravity founder Maitreyi Jichkar.

    The organization had also arranged a muted tour of the shelter. “Rather than volunteers, we made placards and arrows to guide the visitors around the shelter and showed them the conditions in which these girls were living. Many of them came forward to donate,” added Jichkar.

    (Names of inmates at the shelter have been changed)











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    • Re : Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

      MIDC land scam: HC blasts police commissioner, Maharashtra govt for not replying to its notices

      HC’s observations came while hearing a PIL (No 123/2017) by two social workers — Pankaj Thakre and Shivaji Barewar — through counsel Shreerang Bhandarkar, alleging misuse of power by DardaVaibhav Ganjapure | TNN | Updated: June 25, 2018, 07:34 IST

      NAGPUR: Expressing deep anguish over failure of respondents, including State Department of Industries secretary, MIDC officials and city police commissioner to reply to its notices even after six months, the Nagpur bench of Bombay High Court granted them last chance to complete formalities in three weeks. The bench also pulled up Lokmat Newspapers Pvt Ltd (LNPL) and its chairman Vijay Jawaharlal Darda for not showing promptness in filing a reply to its notices.

      “At least at this juncture, we find ourselves at a loss as to why in PIL of this nature the respondents — Nos. 1 (Secretary), 2 (MIDC CEO), 3 (MIDC area manager in city) and 10 (CP of Anti-Corruption Bureau (ACB) -- have avoided to file their replies though a period of more than six months has expired,” a division bench comprising Justices Bhushan Dharmadhikari and Zaka Haq said.

      “Similarly, respondent Nos. 4 (Lokmat) and 5 (Darda) against whom allegations are made have also not shown promptness to file reply. The respondent No. 9 (Butibori Gram Panchayat Sarpanch), though served with notice has chosen not to appear,” the bench stated.

      HC’s observations came while hearing a PIL (No 123/2017) by two social workers — Pankaj Thakre and Shivaji Barewar — through counsel Shreerang Bhandarkar, alleging misuse of power by Darda for acquiring a big land at MIDC Butibori for setting up industry but diverting it for other purposes. They claimed respondents illegally diverted 40,000 square metres commercial land for other purposes and thus caused huge losses to the exchequer due to inaction by authorities.

      The judges also agreed with Bhandarkar’s contention that the respondents, including Media World Enterprises partners — Rachna Darda and Sheetal Jain, Jain Saheli Mandal president Assu Rajendra Darda, and Niyojit Lokmat Karmachari Gruh Nirman Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit at Turakmani in Butibori— were avoiding service of HC notice.

      “The petitioner to complete service through e-mail/Hamdast to Media World, Jain Mandal and Lokmat Karmachari Sanstha and they should also file their reply without fail. If the reply is not received, the court may proceed further in default thereof,” the judges warned before adjourning the hearing till July 11.

      The petitioners having homes in Butibori, cited information obtained under RTI Act to press their claims made against Darda and his family members. The former MP received Plot No. B-192 at Butibori MIDC industrial estate on February 26, 2001, in LNPL’s name for newspaper printing. However, he transferred it in name of Lokmat Media Limited on October 12, 2011.

      According to them, since newspaper printing press is an “industrial” process”, no plot from commercial zone could be allotted for it. However, on Darda’s insistence, MIDC allotted plot from commercial zone and at commercial rates suffering a financial loss.

      Thereafter, Darda allegedly used his influence to allocate another plot, No. B-208 of 1800 square metres, in name of Veena Infosys on March 28, 2001. One more plot (No. B-207) was purchased by him. The Lokmat group then applied for amalgamating three plots together for setting up newspaper press.








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      • Re : Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

        Delay in land acquisition hits Mumbai-Nagpur Expressway

        Sharad Vyas
        MUMBAI, JUNE 25, 2018 00:00 IST
        UPDATED: JUNE 25, 2018 04:14 IST



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        • Re : Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

          Day 3 of Maha plastic ban: 28 traders fined Rs 1.53L, 450kg products seized

          tnn | Jun 26, 2018, 03:56 IST

          Nagpur: On Day 3 of the drive against plastic ban on Monday, the Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) penalized 28 traders and recovered a fine of Rs1.53 lakh from them. The civic body also seized 450.125kg plastic and other banned products.

          “The drive saw no protest. Many shopkeepers, however, downed their shutters after spotting the squad,” said Dr Pradip Dasarwar, NMC’s health officer (sanitation).

          The special force comprising NMC health officials and nuisance detection squad succeeded in imposing fine of Rs5,000 each against two traders in Laxmi Nagar zone.

          The squad in Dharampeth zone seized 70kg banned products from three traders and imposed a fine of Rs11,000. In Lakadganj zone, the squad seized over 78kg plastic products and collected Rs15,000 fine. Similarly, in Gandhibagh zone, Rs10,000 fine was recovered from three traders after seizing 47.5kg plastic products.

          The Mangalwari zone witnessed a rare incident after a vigilant citizen from Bezonbagh T A Ramteke walked and deposited two bags full of plastic carry bags.

          Municipal commissioner Virendra Singh said the civic body has set up collection centres in all 10 zones. Besides, the civic body will soon release zone-level helpline numbers for the citizens, he said.

          Many traders were fined while they were visiting zonal offices to submit banned products. To this, the civic chief said if any citizens or traders call these centres that they will be coming to deposit banned products, no action will be initiated against them.

          He, however, clarified that the garbage collectors will not lift bulk plastics while collecting door-to-door garbage as it will go directly to the Bhandewadi dumping yard and it will defeat the purpose of banning plastic products.

          He appealed to citizens to stop using plastic bags and other banned products. “If they cooperate, the NMC not need to take any action,” he said.













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          • Re : Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

            Behave or face action, civic chief tells citizens

            Anjaya Anparthi| tnn | Jun 26, 2018, 03:52 IST

            Nagpur: Municipal commissioner Virendra Singh on Monday urged citizens to behave responsibly and take responsibility of the city, or face stringent action.

            At a press conference, he urged encroachers to demolish all illegal constructions before the civic body’s action. “In my 50 days here, I found seven problems. All of them can be resolved if citizens realize their responsibilities. This will save Nagpur Municipal Corporation effort, prevent action against citizens, and make the city clean and smart. FIRs will be initiated against repeat offenders,” he said.

            Encroachments on footpaths would be his first target. “We want citizens to get footpaths to walk without any hindrance. Shopkeepers should immediately remove all encroachments,” he said. Singh also gave commercial encroachments time till July 31 before Nagpur Municipal Corporation begins demolishing them.

            Singh also said residential encroachments would be demolished after November 30, as action cannot be taken in monsoon, up to October 30. He also put on notice encroachments in visitors’ parking areas in residential and commercial buildings, with action to begin immediately.

            Singh also requested government departments to take care of encroachments in and around their premises. The civic chief is also taking aim at unauthorized advertisements and defacement of properties. “Indore, ranked first under Swachh Survekshan for two consecutive years, does not have such advertisements on walls,” he said.

            He also asked citizens to avoid dumping garbage in open spaces and open plots. “We all are cleaning Futala lake every morning for last two months. But roads and open spaces near the lake have garbage lying around by evening. Give household waste to NMC workers and, if outside, throw waste in bins,” he said.

            Singh also promised that NMC’s level of services will be improved. “We will begin correcting footpaths, increase number of waste bins, extend anti-encroachment to evenings etc. Only 2% citizens have downloaded Swachhata App.









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            • Re : Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

              HC refuses to stay Durga temple demolition

              Vaibhav Ganjapure| TNN | Jun 26, 2018, 03:06 IST

              Nagpur: The Nagpur bench of Bombay High Court on Monday refused to stay demolition of a Durga Devi temple adjacent to RBI quarters on Amravati Road by the Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC).

              A division bench comprising justices Bhushan Dharmadhikari and Zaka Haq, however, asked NMC counsel Sudhir Puranik to file a detailed reply on petitioner’s contention that the temple was inadvertently included in the list of illegal structures.

              The Durga Mata Trust had rushed to the HC through counsel MK Kulkarni after civic body’s anti-encroachment squad started razing the temple. Kulkarni claimed that the trust was a registered body and dignitaries like Dr Shrikant Jichkar, former mayor Himmatrao Saraikar, former HC judges and others were regular visitors to the temple.

              Stressing that the temple was not an encroachment, he added that it was built seven decades ago when the entire area was an agriculture land. After road widening, the temple came in the midst of the road, he said.

              Kulkarni added that after receiving NMC’s notice, the trust had applied for grant of alternate land to shift the temple. “The civic officials told the trust to contact divisional commissioner, who in turn directed the collector to explore land adjacent to Dadadham near Ambazari police station. But no decision has been taken on the proposal so far,” Kulkarni said.

              The NMC’s demolition drive against illegal religious structures started only after the civic body was slammed by the HC for failure to do so for years, despite repeated directives. The HC summoned top civic officials and warned them of contempt notice if they failed to remove the structures which were mushrooming all over the city.









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              • Re : Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

                AMRUT water project cost up by 47cr even before execution

                Anjaya Anparthi| tnn | Jun 26, 2018, 17:55 IST

                Nagpur: In a major loss of public money, the project cost of water supply project sanctioned for unauthorized layouts under the central government’s Atal Mission For Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT) has increased by Rs47.09 crore even before execution. Inordinate delay in execution of the project by the Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) has led to the cost escalation.

                The state’s urban development department on Monday issued a notification approving the project’s revised cost of Rs273.78 crore. On October 29, 2016, the government had approved the project at the cost of Rs226.69 crore.

                As per the notification, the project’s cost was finalized as per common schedule of rates (CSR) of 2015-16. Twenty months have passed since the initial approval and CSR has increased to a great extent during this period. The government revised the cost as per CSR of current fiscal 2018-19.

                NMC official told TOI project has been delayed due to low response to the first tendering process followed by very high bidding the second time. “Later, confusion prevailed whether the NMC or the Maharashtra Jeevan Pradhikaran (MJP) will execute the project. Guardian minister Chandrashekar Bawankule was stressing execution of the project by MJP,” he said.

                NMC official added the project can be executed now after cost revision.

                As per revised cost, NMC’s share will be Rs136.98 crore (50%), central government Rs91.25 crore (33.33%) and state government Rs45.64 crore (16.67%).

                Under the project, water pipeline network of 58.71km will be laid in unauthorized layouts on city’s outskirts. Elevated water reservoirs (overhead water tanks) with storage capacity of 10-27.5 lakh litres will be constructed at 42 locations and ground level service reservoir at one location. Internal water distribution network of 377.84km will also be laid.

                Currently, households in unauthorized layouts are supplied water through tankers while some areas are dependent on bore-wells. The civic body is aiming to make city water tanker free on completion of the project.

                Mhada gets Sutgirni’s 20.20 acre land

                The state government has decided to allot 20.20 acres land of Umrer road-based Sutgirni to Mhada at ready reckoner value. The state’s cooperative, marketing and textile department issued a notification on Monday approving transfer of land to Mhada.

                As per the notification, the Sutgirni was abandoned in 2013. Nagpur Winkar Sahakari Sutgirni Maryadit came into existence in June 1962. The society was allotted land for the textile mill. The society went into liquidation in June 1996. The period of liquidation was terminated in May 2011. The society was de-registered in June 2013. Since then, the land and assets of the society were under the monitoring of regional deputy director of textile department.

                Though not confirmed, Mhada is likely to develop commercial and residential buildings on the land.






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                • Re : Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

                  Day 3 of Maha plastic ban: 28 traders fined Rs 1.53L, 450kg products seized

                  TNN | Updated: Jun 26, 2018, 14:40 IST Representative image

                  NAGPUR: On Day 3 of the drive against plastic ban on Monday, the Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) penalized 28 traders and recovered a fine of Rs1.53 lakh from them. The civic body also seized 450.125kg plastic and other banned products.

                  “The drive saw no protest. Many shopkeepers, however, downed their shutters after spotting the squad,” said Dr Pradip Dasarwar, NMC’s health officer (sanitation).

                  The special force comprising NMC health officials and nuisance detection squad succeeded in imposing fine of Rs5,000 each against two traders in Laxmi Nagar zone.

                  The squad in Dharampeth zone seized 70kg banned products from three traders and imposed a fine of Rs11,000. In Lakadganj zone, the squad seized over 78kg plastic products and collected Rs15,000 fine. Similarly, in Gandhibagh zone, Rs10,000 fine was recovered from three traders after seizing 47.5kg plastic products.

                  The Mangalwari zone witnessed a rare incident after a vigilant citizen from Bezonbagh T A Ramteke walked and deposited two bags full of plastic carry bags.

                  Municipal commissioner Virendra Singh said the civic body has set up collection centres in all 10 zones. Besides, the civic body will soon release zone-level helpline numbers for the citizens, he said.

                  Many traders were fined while they were visiting zonal offices to submit banned products. To this, the civic chief said if any citizens or traders call these centres that they will be coming to deposit banned products, no action will be initiated against them.

                  He, however, clarified that the garbage collectors will not lift bulk plastics while collecting door-to-door garbage as it will go directly to the Bhandewadi dumping yard and it will defeat the purpose of banning plastic products.

                  He appealed to citizens to stop using plastic bags and other banned products. “If they cooperate, the NMC not need to take any action,” he said.







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                  • Re : Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

                    NMC preps up for next Swachh Survekshan rankings

                    Anjaya Anparthi| tnn | Jun 27, 2018, 00:29 IST

                    Nagpur: The Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) has started preparations for next year’s Swachh Survekshan rankings from Tuesday. Target has been finalized to top the rankings.

                    In the rankings announced two days ago, the city had stood at 55 of total 100 cities with population of over 1 lakh.

                    Municipal commissioner Virendra Singh held meeting with the officials of the NMC and Swachh Ambassadors. Additional municipal commissioner Ravindra Kumbhare, deputy municipal commissioner Jayant Dandegaonkar and other officials were present.

                    Dandegaonkar informed all about deadlines of various parameters and aspects of the next year’s rankings. He said last date for downloading Swachhata App was June 30.

                    Singh urged the Swachh Ambassadors and officials to encourage the citizens to download and start using the App.

                    Swachh Ambassadors— Dr Chandrashekar Meshram, RJ Nikita and Kaustubh Chateerjee suggested few measures for scoring well in the rankings. NMC officials suggested sweeping and lifting of garbage from market places even during nights, installation of sensors in all garbage bins, levy of cess on those generating garbage in bulk quantity etc.

                    Review of works under Swachh Bharat Mission will be taken once in every 15 days. Also, a meeting with the NMC officials and Swachh Ambassadors will be hold once in every month.










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                    • Re : Nagpur Best place for Real Estate Investment

                      Ambiguity prevails even as retailers ask for substitutes for repackaging

                      Barkha Mathur| TNN | Jun 27, 2018, 02:01 IST Plastic bags used after banned state-widesteep fines ranging from Rs 5,000 to Rs 25,000 will be imposed on tho... Read More

                      Nagpur: With 80% of the material being repacked in plastic bags in grocery retail stores, ambiguity and lack of information about what has been banned and what is to be used prevailed in most of the super markets in the city.

                      “The government has brought the ban without putting in place any substitutes,” says Ravi Agarwal, partner, Purushottam Super Bazaar. “We are planning to pack all grains, lentils, pulses and spices in 50+ micron bags but there too we do not know if it’s allowed or banned,” he says.

                      Blasting the government for exempting FMCG companies from the ban, Agarwal says, “Oil pouches, biscuits, soaps, salt and many other branded items are packed in plastic which is less than 50 microns but they are not in the ambit. Why should there be this disparity?”

                      Though the implementation of the ban is being welcomed by one and all, yet the grocery stores are among the worst hit by it. The fact that the government has not been able to suggest any substitutes even three months after bringing the ban has made matters worse.

                      “We are willing to use whatever is offered as a substitute,” says Avinash Magdum, manager at Purti Super Bazaar. “We started repacking grains and similar items in 50 micron bags last week onwards but it is proving difficult as they are thick. Instead of carry bags, we are giving cloth bags to customers. But if there is no clarity on this issue then we will be forced to become like ordinary kirana stores and keep grains etc in drums and jute sacks,” he says.

                      But 50 micron bags are not tough enough to hold the weight of 5kg of rice or sugar, says Vishal Kinkar, store manager at Food Bazaar, Ramdaspeth. “We have to split it in two kg packs,” he says and adds that his store has stopped procuring items made by local manufacturers. “Items like papads, snacks and laddus etc which are produced by small enterprises and packed in less than 50 microns plastic bags are not being sold here and we have informed them to use alternative packaging.”

                      Not only the retailers but law enforcement authorities also are unclear about the rules. “So far, the inspections are being done for disposable items only and there is no clarity about repackaging material,” says Vivek Thakkar of Punit Super Bazaar.

                      What is also creating a certain level of bewilderment is that many items like breads, snacks and frozen foods are exempt as it is manufacturer level packaging. “What is the motto of the ban? If it is against the use of plastic then there should be no differentiation,” Thakkar says.

                      “We are consulting with other super markets about alternatives which can be used,” says Samiksha, manager at Poonam Super Bazaar. “As of now we have removed all repackaged items from the shelves and have asked customers to send us a list of items which we are packing in paper bags,” she says.








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