In Gurgaon, every day is a thrilling adventure - Hilarious/True?

GURGAON: Recently, one of my NRI (Newly Returned Indian) neighbours complained about the lack of adventure sports and exciting outdoor activities in Gurgaon. He claimed that 'back home' in the US, he could pursue pastimes like mountain biking, canoeing or parasailing — all within a 10-mile radius from his house. There is nothing like that in Gurgaon, he moaned, for that adrenaline rush, that special thrill that comes from plunging down a cliff into sheer nothingness, the feeling of challenging nature and beating the odds, of pushing oneself to one's limits, etc.

Clearly, he knew very little about the extreme sports that we Gurgaonites get an opportunity to indulge in every day of the week, apart from the special seasonal sporting opportunities. Here are the most popular ones.

Red Light Jumping: Forget bungee jumping. What is so courageous about leaping off a cliff knowing that you are safely tied to a stout rope? It takes real guts and precise timing to wait until the last minute and scrape past the signal just as the light turns red. The black SUV in front of you with Gujjar Boy written on the rear window has already rushed past, overtaking you on the wrong side, challenging you to follow suit. Will you make it without loss of life, licence and lasting damage to your vehicle? Nothing can compare to this adrenaline rush.

Jay Walking: Move to a busy place, like MG road on a Saturday evening. Start warming up by walking on the pavement, if you can find it. By the time you dodge a stray pig, jump over a pile of rubble, outmanoeuvre a cycle rickshaw and side-step a lump of dog poop, you are ready for the final test. Watch the pattern of traffic carefully for a break in the flow. When you are tired of watching, run across the road. For added excitement, cross the road holding hands with friends and family. Raise your hands up and scream as though you are on a roller coaster. For extra points, cross back to pick up little Pappu who got left behind on the other side.

Cutting the Queue: The real version of this sport is played out at the toll plaza on NH8. The aim is to disprove the Universal Queue Principle: 'The queue you have joined will be the slowest among all queues.' To achieve the objective, one must continuously keep switching lanes and joining the lane that seems to move the fastest. Since everyone who has queued up at the toll plaza is in a desperate hurry to rush to a life-threatening emergency, the game promises each player the euphoric feeling of struggling against all odds and beating your neighbour to the toll booth. The toll booth officials have taken the game to another level by levying a fee of Rs 21 and ensuring that booths are manned by mathematically challenged folks who will take forever to hand you the change. For a variation, you can try the same game at the parking queue at a mall on a busy weekend.

Fog Driving: For the sheer thrill of taking a plunge into nothingness, try driving in Gurgaon on a foggy night in late December. The local municipal authorities officially sponsor this sport by ensuring that none of the street lights work. Even an extreme sport stalwart will find it unnerving to drive into a dense gray mist in which you cannot see beyond your nose. Add a dose of mystery and suspense by trying to guess which road you are on and whether the sudden thump on your car means that you have run over a stray pig, bumped into a roadblock, rammed another vehicle or reached the gate of your house.

Wild Water Rafting: Gurgaonites no longer have to go to Rishikesh to experience the joys of navigating large swathes of gushing water. Sitting in your vehicle during the monsoons with the water slowly rising up to the exhaust pipe can make you feel that you are in a canoe without a paddle. The objective for the pedestrian and driver is to get from one place to another on the waterlogged roads without drowning, catching pneumonia or walking through untreated sewage.

To push yourself to your limits, try driving through the routes that have Level 4 rapids such as the Three Great Potholes, Stalling Stretch and Drain OverFlow.

In Gurgaon, every day is a thrilling adventure.

In Gurgaon, every day is a thrilling adventure - The Times of India
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  • Gurgaon's main artery choking

    GURGAON: All along the MG Road - the city's main shopping boulevard - the malls are adorned with advertisement hoardings promising 'good living'.
    The haute-couture boutiques, the plush restaurants, the luxury spas, and the swanky interiors of the malls are all designed to give the consumers an 'international experience', not unlike what you might get in any other shopping capital of the world. But in Gurgaon, luxury ends where you see the sign displaying 'exit'.
    You step out of the malls, and step back into the real Gurgaon — the piles of garbage dumped on the roadsides, the broken pavements, the uneven roads, the dangling high-tension cables and the hollers of auto-rickshaw wallahs.



    Shruti Sharma, a management student, is holding two shopping bags carrying the label of an American clothing brand. "There is no way Gurgaon's shopping experience compares with international standards," she says. Gurgaon Shopping Festival, which was organized last year, was modelled on a similar event held in Dubai annually.
    "It's funny to even compare the mall road to the shopping centres of Dubai or Singapore. You step out of the malls here, and it is chaos," she says.
    Gurgaon's mall road won't really become our very own 5th Avenue any soon, but the residents believe that it still could do with a facelift. "Singapore? Really? I mean look at it," says Taniya, an 18-year-old student pointing at a brimming rubbish can. "This is the most popular stretch in Gurgaon, and look at the shape it is in."
    A thorough clean-up job is the least one can ask of the people in charge. "We are not talking about a beautification drive. They should at least take care of garbage, the green belt, and the pavements which are in a sorry state," says Sumit Verma, a city-based IT professional. Ideally, he says, the exterior should match the interiors of the malls, if Gurgaon is to live up to its undeserved tag of 'Millennium City'. "Some new malls are coming up, and some of the most important commercial complexes are here. I don't understand how this road could be neglected," he adds.
    After the metro line was built along this route, the illegally parked cycle rickshaws and auto-rickshaws have also messed up the scene on MG Road. "The worst thing is that you can't even cross the road on this entire stretch," says a shopper, Mira. Apart from the MG Road Metro station, which doubles as a foot overbridge, crossing the road along the mall stretch is a nuisance. "Nobody uses the metro station crossing. And suppose you are at some distance from it, you have to go through the speeding traffic," she says.
    If Delhi can do it, so can Gurgaon. The swish shopping mall complexes in Saket and Vasant Kunj are still, by and large, more appealing to people. "When you are in the Vasant Kunj or Saket malls, the experience is way better than most malls in Gurgaon. Those complexes are far better designed, and are clean and smooth all through. Over here on the MG Road, I would say that it feels a bit middle-class still," says Arun Malik, a chartered accountant living in Gurgaon
    CommentQuote
  • Originally Posted by rajesh_vsworx
    GURGAON: All along the MG Road - the city's main shopping boulevard - the malls are adorned with advertisement hoardings promising 'good living'.
    The haute-couture boutiques, the plush restaurants, the luxury spas, and the swanky interiors of the malls are all designed to give the consumers an 'international experience', not unlike what you might get in any other shopping capital of the world. But in Gurgaon, luxury ends where you see the sign displaying 'exit'.
    You step out of the malls, and step back into the real Gurgaon — the piles of garbage dumped on the roadsides, the broken pavements, the uneven roads, the dangling high-tension cables and the hollers of auto-rickshaw wallahs.



    Shruti Sharma, a management student, is holding two shopping bags carrying the label of an American clothing brand. "There is no way Gurgaon's shopping experience compares with international standards," she says. Gurgaon Shopping Festival, which was organized last year, was modelled on a similar event held in Dubai annually.
    "It's funny to even compare the mall road to the shopping centres of Dubai or Singapore. You step out of the malls here, and it is chaos," she says.
    Gurgaon's mall road won't really become our very own 5th Avenue any soon, but the residents believe that it still could do with a facelift. "Singapore? Really? I mean look at it," says Taniya, an 18-year-old student pointing at a brimming rubbish can. "This is the most popular stretch in Gurgaon, and look at the shape it is in."
    A thorough clean-up job is the least one can ask of the people in charge. "We are not talking about a beautification drive. They should at least take care of garbage, the green belt, and the pavements which are in a sorry state," says Sumit Verma, a city-based IT professional. Ideally, he says, the exterior should match the interiors of the malls, if Gurgaon is to live up to its undeserved tag of 'Millennium City'. "Some new malls are coming up, and some of the most important commercial complexes are here. I don't understand how this road could be neglected," he adds.
    After the metro line was built along this route, the illegally parked cycle rickshaws and auto-rickshaws have also messed up the scene on MG Road. "The worst thing is that you can't even cross the road on this entire stretch," says a shopper, Mira. Apart from the MG Road Metro station, which doubles as a foot overbridge, crossing the road along the mall stretch is a nuisance. "Nobody uses the metro station crossing. And suppose you are at some distance from it, you have to go through the speeding traffic," she says.
    If Delhi can do it, so can Gurgaon. The swish shopping mall complexes in Saket and Vasant Kunj are still, by and large, more appealing to people. "When you are in the Vasant Kunj or Saket malls, the experience is way better than most malls in Gurgaon. Those complexes are far better designed, and are clean and smooth all through. Over here on the MG Road, I would say that it feels a bit middle-class still," says Arun Malik, a chartered accountant living in Gurgaon

    :oThis is what we can call Internationalization under National set up, Cheer up MY INDIA:D
    CommentQuote
  • Others vs India

    US/Canada
    People in US/Canada don't have any responsibilities for their elders and even kids(after certain age). Earning money here is easy and
    you can enjoy good living standard very easily without any hoch-poch.
    So, you have free time now. What to do? Let's start doing something good to others and the environment.

    India
    India is very rich in culture. We all are rushing/killing ourself (not for 'I'), but for 'us'(family members). And everybody thinks
    'Phale apne ko sambhal le, phir baad mein puri duniya ki chinta kargein'.
    I LOVE MY INDIA.
    CommentQuote
  • Originally Posted by anshgupta800
    US/Canada
    People in US/Canada don't have any responsibilities for their elders and even kids(after certain age). Earning money here is easy and
    you can enjoy good living standard very easily without any hoch-poch.
    So, you have free time now. What to do? Let's start doing something good to others and the environment.

    India
    India is very rich in culture. We all are rushing/killing ourself (not for 'I'), but for 'us'(family members). And everybody thinks
    'Phale apne ko sambhal le, phir baad mein puri duniya ki chinta kargein'.
    I LOVE MY INDIA.


    What an excuse !!!

    The problem I see is just the initiative. We Indians always follow the crowd. Agar wo nahin kar raha hai to main kyon karoon.. that kind of stuff. It will take time to change the attitude.
    CommentQuote
  • Originally Posted by anshgupta800
    US/Canada
    People in US/Canada don't have any responsibilities for their elders and even kids(after certain age). Earning money here is easy and
    you can enjoy good living standard very easily without any hoch-poch.
    So, you have free time now. What to do? Let's start doing something good to others and the environment.

    India
    India is very rich in culture. We all are rushing/killing ourself (not for 'I'), but for 'us'(family members). And everybody thinks
    'Phale apne ko sambhal le, phir baad mein puri duniya ki chinta kargein'.
    I LOVE MY INDIA.


    What a joke - jub bhi argument mein haarne lago to apni sanskriti ka gaana gaa lo... LOL
    CommentQuote
  • Which argument!!

    Originally Posted by rajatk
    What a joke - jub bhi argument mein haarne lago to apni sanskriti ka gaana gaa lo... LOL


    Bhai,

    Anshgupta800 kaunsi argument haar raha tha :), I would say it is right if that you are satisfied from basic requirements of life, then y will u like to harm anyone.. that is what at a large levels happens in US and Canada.. People are worryless most of the time as they know that they have some rights and the rights themselves are in place... they need not to fight for something which belongs to them.. so at large level they do not have time to think bad about anyone else...

    as correctly said by someone in this thread that there is something seriously wrong with India... Let me bolster that with and example... Corruption kaha se start hui???????????? i cite it this way... The corporate tax in india during early 70's was more than 90% (Not sure but i read it somewhere 2 3 times). to agar tum 1 business chala rahe ho and usme se 100 rs profit ka sirf 10 ya usse kam tumare paas aata hai to bhai.. kya karoge?? obviously apni income less show karoge. Rich minds such as IITians or IIM guys who are business oriented will not stay in India and then we ll say those assholes went leaving the Motherland...

    not saying that I am 100% right ... but just a perspective
    CommentQuote
  • Originally Posted by anshgupta800
    US/Canada
    People in US/Canada don't have any responsibilities for their elders and even kids(after certain age). Earning money here is easy and
    you can enjoy good living standard very easily without any hoch-poch.
    So, you have free time now. What to do? Let's start doing something good to others and the environment.

    India
    India is very rich in culture. We all are rushing/killing ourself (not for 'I'), but for 'us'(family members). And everybody thinks
    'Phale apne ko sambhal le, phir baad mein puri duniya ki chinta kargein'.
    I LOVE MY INDIA.


    bab (38):This is INCREDIBLE INDIA!:D:bab (22):
    CommentQuote
  • Originally Posted by anshgupta800
    US/Canada
    People in US/Canada don't have any responsibilities for their elders and even kids(after certain age). Earning money here is easy and
    you can enjoy good living standard very easily without any hoch-poch.
    So, you have free time now. What to do? Let's start doing something good to others and the environment.

    India
    India is very rich in culture. We all are rushing/killing ourself (not for 'I'), but for 'us'(family members). And everybody thinks
    'Phale apne ko sambhal le, phir baad mein puri duniya ki chinta kargein'.
    I LOVE MY INDIA.

    Culture my foot..!!

    Honour killing is our culture?? Does it happen in any other country?

    Money is not the concern dude... India is very rich.. just that we keep our 280 lacs abroad ... !!!

    The "we" you said has backfired big time in India... Pick any newspaper and see how many killings, stressed life, burning females and what not is happening just because of this "we". I am not saying that we should turn into "I", but we should be flexible to turn into "I" before stressing to a level when relatives starts blood bath...!!!
    CommentQuote
  • Originally Posted by richhaah
    Bhai,

    Anshgupta800 kaunsi argument haar raha tha :), I would say it is right if that you are satisfied from basic requirements of life, then y will u like to harm anyone.. that is what at a large levels happens in US and Canada.. People are worryless most of the time as they know that they have some rights and the rights themselves are in place... they need not to fight for something which belongs to them.. so at large level they do not have time to think bad about anyone else...

    as correctly said by someone in this thread that there is something seriously wrong with India... Let me bolster that with and example... Corruption kaha se start hui???????????? i cite it this way... The corporate tax in india during early 70's was more than 90% (Not sure but i read it somewhere 2 3 times). to agar tum 1 business chala rahe ho and usme se 100 rs profit ka sirf 10 ya usse kam tumare paas aata hai to bhai.. kya karoge?? obviously apni income less show karoge. Rich minds such as IITians or IIM guys who are business oriented will not stay in India and then we ll say those assholes went leaving the Motherland...

    not saying that I am 100% right ... but just a perspective


    Sulphate ho yaar tum bhi... faaltu ka gyaan pilaa rahe ho..
    CommentQuote