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A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

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A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

Last updated: December 7 2011
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  • A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

    With quick and timely delivery a selling point, developers take to newer construction methods.

    It’s a race among real estate developers to complete a floor quicker than the rest. With timely delivery of projects turning into a selling point, innovative technology is being put to use by realtors like never before.

    Raheja Developers, which recently tied up with Dubai-based Arabtec Constructions, would be using a combination of various technologies for three highrise residential projects in Gurgaon and Delhi. Expected to be the tallest tower in Gurgaon, the construction of a 60-floor Raheja Revanta will involve using three major techniques, ‘slip form construction’, ‘pre-fabricated construction’ and ‘dry-wall technique’.


    Supertech, building an 80-floor mixed use building, Supernova, in Gurgaon, which it claims would be the tallest in the country, will be using a jump-form or slip form technology imported from Australia. Raheja Developers’ Director Nayan Raheja said slip form construction would enable them to build a floor in just three to four days, as against 15 days using traditional technology. “Slip form will take only one fifth of the time of what the traditional technique takes,” he said.

    Concrete is poured into a continuously moving form that enables continuous, non-interrupted, cast-in-place “flawless” (no joints) structures, which have superior performance characteristics versus piecewise construction using discrete form elements.

    R K Arora, chairman and managing director, Supertech, told Business Standard, the technique would help them do a floor in just seven days. Pre-fabricated construction includes doing electrical and plumbing work at the stage of casting RCC (reinforced cement concrete) on ground, which developers are starting to use these days. It is expected to cut construction time by more than half, Arora said.

    “However, it has its disadvantage,” said Raheja. “As plumbing and electrical work can’t be changed at a later stage, we have to be very careful.” Yet, prefabricated construction is gaining pace in India, with many developers going for it.

    “Developers are using steel frames to build a structure and then to do the interiors with prefabricated structures,” said Samarjit Singh, CEO, Agni Properties.

    A dry-wall technique involves constructing interior walls, ceilings and floors through plastered or microfibre board, joined during the installation. Apart from offering sound control, dry-wall construction can also make an interior space fire-resistant and damp-resistant.

    “A dry-wall technique is easier, faster and more economical compared to the traditional technique of hand plastering,” Raheja said.

    Arora, however, calls the dry-wall technique an expensive one in India at the moment, as it involves sound proofing, which is not economical. “However, it definitely ensures quick completion of projects,” he said.

    Raheja says construction techniques in India are nearly 20 years behind the Western world. “In the West, clay brick is out of construction; in India, we still use it.” He said innovative construction techniques would also add 10 per cent to construction cost.

    Supertech has a business development department which keeps a watch on innovation and construction techniques around the world.

    Anshuman Magazine, chairman and managing director, CB Richard Ellis (South Asia), said developers in India are importing advanced construction technology in order to maintain competitive edge in the market.

    “Today, customers’ focus is on who delivers the project on time, which has become a selling point for the developers.” Also, a lot of highrise buildings are coming up, where one can’t do without the use of technology.

    Singh said with the focus also shifting towards affordable housings, developers are cutting costs using improved and innovative construction techniques for quicker completion.

    “Jerry Rao’s VBHC, an affordable housing project in Bangalore, is also focusing on using technology to build affordable homes at Rs four to six lakh, while promising delivery within six months from starting construction”.
    Singh believes that the use of technology will only grow in the coming years, letting developers complete projects in just three to four months.

    -Business Standard
  • #2

    #2

    Re : A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

    Builder may give possession of 100% flats within 6-8 month by this technique.. but still too far if you think in reality…

    Comment

    • #3

      #3

      Re : A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

      the bigger these builders talk....the more scared i get

      Comment

      • #4

        #4

        Re : A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

        Prefabricated multistorey buildings are popular abroad.Rooms are assembled just like building blocks and within hours, the flat is ready.

        Comment

        • #5

          #5

          Re : A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

          Don't know what kind of assembled stuff will work for walls. Hope the wall does not collapse when a NAIL is put in...

          Anyway, good to hear that international expertise is at least thought to rope in for prestigious projects.

          Comment

          • #6

            #6

            Re : A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

            Originally posted by fritolay_ps View Post
            With quick and timely delivery a selling point, developers take to newer construction methods.

            It’s a race among real estate developers to complete a floor quicker than the rest. With timely delivery of projects turning into a selling point, innovative technology is being put to use by realtors like never before.

            Raheja Developers, which recently tied up with Dubai-based Arabtec Constructions, would be using a combination of various technologies for three highrise residential projects in Gurgaon and Delhi. Expected to be the tallest tower in Gurgaon, the construction of a 60-floor Raheja Revanta will involve using three major techniques, ‘slip form construction’, ‘pre-fabricated construction’ and ‘dry-wall technique’.


            Supertech, building an 80-floor mixed use building, Supernova, in Gurgaon, which it claims would be the tallest in the country, will be using a jump-form or slip form technology imported from Australia. Raheja Developers’ Director Nayan Raheja said slip form construction would enable them to build a floor in just three to four days, as against 15 days using traditional technology. “Slip form will take only one fifth of the time of what the traditional technique takes,” he said.

            Concrete is poured into a continuously moving form that enables continuous, non-interrupted, cast-in-place “flawless” (no joints) structures, which have superior performance characteristics versus piecewise construction using discrete form elements.

            R K Arora, chairman and managing director, Supertech, told Business Standard, the technique would help them do a floor in just seven days. Pre-fabricated construction includes doing electrical and plumbing work at the stage of casting RCC (reinforced cement concrete) on ground, which developers are starting to use these days. It is expected to cut construction time by more than half, Arora said.

            “However, it has its disadvantage,” said Raheja. “As plumbing and electrical work can’t be changed at a later stage, we have to be very careful.” Yet, prefabricated construction is gaining pace in India, with many developers going for it.

            “Developers are using steel frames to build a structure and then to do the interiors with prefabricated structures,” said Samarjit Singh, CEO, Agni Properties.

            A dry-wall technique involves constructing interior walls, ceilings and floors through plastered or microfibre board, joined during the installation. Apart from offering sound control, dry-wall construction can also make an interior space fire-resistant and damp-resistant.

            “A dry-wall technique is easier, faster and more economical compared to the traditional technique of hand plastering,” Raheja said.

            Arora, however, calls the dry-wall technique an expensive one in India at the moment, as it involves sound proofing, which is not economical. “However, it definitely ensures quick completion of projects,” he said.

            Raheja says construction techniques in India are nearly 20 years behind the Western world. “In the West, clay brick is out of construction; in India, we still use it.” He said innovative construction techniques would also add 10 per cent to construction cost.

            Supertech has a business development department which keeps a watch on innovation and construction techniques around the world.

            Anshuman Magazine, chairman and managing director, CB Richard Ellis (South Asia), said developers in India are importing advanced construction technology in order to maintain competitive edge in the market.

            “Today, customers’ focus is on who delivers the project on time, which has become a selling point for the developers.” Also, a lot of highrise buildings are coming up, where one can’t do without the use of technology.

            Singh said with the focus also shifting towards affordable housings, developers are cutting costs using improved and innovative construction techniques for quicker completion.

            “Jerry Rao’s VBHC, an affordable housing project in Bangalore, is also focusing on using technology to build affordable homes at Rs four to six lakh, while promising delivery within six months from starting construction”.
            Singh believes that the use of technology will only grow in the coming years, letting developers complete projects in just three to four months.

            -Business Standard
            And I thought this Supernova thing is in Noida....

            Comment

            • #7

              #7

              Re : A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

              Developers Logix group, Hiranandani group, Supertech and others look for ways to reduce costs and meet deadline

              NEW DELHI: Staff at the project site of the City Centre project in Noida was taken aback when the developer Logix group decided to use prefabricated steel instead of reinforced concrete cement (RCC) for the structure. Moreover, a part of the structure was already built using RCC yet the developer went ahead with the change as using only steel would help them finish the project much ahead of time, reducing cost of capital for the company by 15%.

              In an environment where real estate developers are struggling with multiple cost pressures - from high cost of capital to labour and construction materials - companies are trying to find different ways to reduce cost and speed up construction. In the past one year, labour cost has jumped 40-60%, while steel and cement costs have gone up by about 50% in the last 3-6 months.

              "Using only steel for our structures will increase the cost by 15% but we will then be able to deliver the project a-year-and-a-half in advance," said Shakti Nath, managing director of Logix group.

              Savings would accrue for the developers through lower interest payment on borrowings and the fact that they will then be able to lease or sell the property faster.

              For developers today, one of the biggest concerns is labour - both cost and availability. To reduce their dependence on labour, many are investing in better mechanisation. "Earlier, most developers were not very open about investing in plant, machinery and vehicles. Much work was done manually, which took excessive time, hence the delays," said Harleen Oberoi, executive director, project management India at property advisory firm Cushman & Wakefield.


              Now, even small-scale developers working in outskirts of cities are using tower cranes to speed up material movement. "Even in a place like Thane, where almost a year ago hardly any tower crane was seen, developers are starting to use them," said Niranjan Hiranandani, managing director of Hiranandani group.

              Developers have recognised that at every stage of the construction cycle, there is an opportunity to reduce or at least rationalise costs.

              Many a time delays start even before a brick is laid. Some Indian architects give piecemeal drawings of the project rather than the entire plan at once, because of which the construction team is unable to plan optimally.

              For the latest mixed-use project Supernova, developer Supertech, has hired a London-based design and architecture firm Benoy for the expertise in designing mixed-use projects.

              "When we work with an international architect, the plans for the buildings are 100% frozen before we start work. This helps us finalise orders for material, labour and other items early in the project rather than doing it while construction is going on," said RK Arora, managing director of Supertech. This early placement of orders saves him at least 5-7% of cost. There is additional benefit as about 10-20% time is saved because everything is planned early.

              The adoption of better construction technologies too is helping developers reduce delivery time, especially for high-rise projects. UAE-based construction company, Arabtec Construction, which has constructed the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, is bringing in speed technologies for highrise buildings. For the Burj Khalifa, Arabtec used self-climbing classing systems, which meant the average time taken to build one floor was brought down to seven days.

              "This is what we intend to deliver in India as well," said GC Christofides, chief executive officer of Arabtec Construction. Using manual techniques, the average time taken in India at the moment is 24-25 days per floor.

              (Source: The Economic Times)
              (Link: Developers Logix group, Hiranandani group, Supertech and others look for ways to reduce costs and meet deadline - The Economic Times)

              Comment

              • #8

                #8

                Re : A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

                Hope all things in reallity become like mention in news........ As end user staying in these apartment might be little scared at start time... but its great technology getting hi tech...

                Comment

                • #9

                  #9

                  Re : A floor completed in just three days: New reality of Indian realty

                  The use of technology for mankind has been demonstrated in building up great cities & stunning urban infrastructure around the world. The only problem in India is the mentality... of not using it timely (i.e. over-use & under-use) and properly (i.e. misuse)...on a lighter note, what works here most of the time is 'jugar technology'

                  Comment

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