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Noida:New projects, What to do

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Noida:New projects, What to do

Last updated: March 14 2013
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  • #31

    #31

    Re : Noida:New projects, What to do

    Its great buddy.....i think u have done so much R & D for this !!!

    Comment

    • #32

      #32

      Re : Noida:New projects, What to do

      Great analysis Sanjeev. I was not aware of this info.

      No wonder so many projects are being anounced. There was massive advertising in todays newspaper.

      Wonder where all this will end.

      Originally posted by sanjeevchaudhri View Post
      Guys, there is one more point.

      Now, the builders have to pay a lot less to get hold of a GHP plot in Noida.

      Scenario prior to 2009:

      1. Bid for a plot.
      2. Won the bid. Pay 10% of the plot price within 30 days.
      3. Pay 30% of the plot price + registration + lease rent within 90 days.
      4. Pay the remaining 60% of plot price in 8 half yearly installment with interest (in next 4 years).

      In/After 2009:
      1. Bid for a plot.
      2. Pay 10% of the plot price + registration + lease rent within 90 days.
      3. For the next 2 years, pay ONLY INTEREST on the remaining 90% of plot price.
      4. Pay the remaining 90% of plot price in 16 half yearly installment with interest (in next 8 years).


      Suppose the plot size is 10 acres (40000 sq mt approx) and the winning bid is Rs 25,000 per sq mt.

      Total plot premium: Rs 100 crores

      Prior to 2009:

      Within 90 days, the builder has to pay 40% of plot price + 5 % as registration + 1 % as lease rent which is equal to 46% = Rs 46 crore.

      In/After 2009:
      Within 90 days, the builder has to pay 10% of plot price + 5 % as registration + 1 % as lease rent which is equal to 16% = Rs 16 crore.

      So the amount which is at stake initially now for the builder is very less as compared to what it was prior to mid 2009.

      Now, there is also a provision that if a builder defaults, NOIDA authority would deduct 10% from the already deposited amount and give a part of the plot in proportion to the already deposited amount.

      At present, in case a builder is not able to attract enough bookings, he might simply default after 2 years since the amount of stake is not much.
      Venky (Please read watch a or before posting)

      Comment

      • #33

        #33

        Re : Noida:New projects, What to do

        Dear Forum Members,

        Could any one update me about the status of unihomes sector 117 noida project, I had enquired around Sept/Oct 2009 and they told me that soil testing is in progress and digging work will start by December, is it really started af of now?? thanks in advance.

        Comment

        • #34

          #34

          Re : Noida:New projects, What to do

          I passed this site recently. There is fencing around site. Some activity is on.

          There is no deep foundation digging.
          Venky (Please read watch a or before posting)

          Comment

          • #35

            #35

            Re : Noida:New projects, What to do

            Today sector 135

            Hi can anybody have any idea about Todays Homes sector 135 noida

            Comment

            • #36

              #36

              Re : Noida:New projects, What to do

              Hi Rajiv, the project is good and we can expect the area to be inhabited after 2 years since HIG flat (which is adjacent to the site) families are expected to move by this year end. METLIFE is already operational. Compared to 137, this might be a better choice considering the time bracket of next 3 to 5 years. But, flat layouts is something that you need to look at. If you are liking the same and want to be closer to GN/Delhi, then its worth considering.

              Comment

              • #37

                #37

                Re : Noida:New projects, What to do

                Diff in configuration of earlier vs current GHP flats

                Prior to 2008:
                ===========
                The FAR for GHP was 2.
                Height of the building was restricted to 8 stories.

                Most of the building configuration had maximum of 4 flats per floor and minimum of 2 lifts.

                Hence the 2 lifts used to cater to a maximum of 28 (7 * 4) flats (assuming gnd floor would not normally use the lifts.

                The waiting time and congestion for the lifts used to be bearable or non-existent.

                Scenario now in 2010:
                ================
                FAR is 2.75.
                There is no restriction on height.

                Builders are now construction minimum of 14 stories and going up-to 25-30 stories with 6 or 8 flats per floor.

                Consider Amrapali Zodiac:

                Flats per floor 8.
                No of stories 15.
                No of lifts 2.
                These 2 lifts would cater to (14 * 8) = 112 families.

                Amrapali Pan Oasis:
                Flats per floor 6.
                No of stories 20.
                No of lifts 2.
                These 2 lifts would cater to (19 * 6) = 114 families.

                The most critical time in the mornings is from 7 am to 7:30 am when most of the children leave for school/college. Visualize the chaos when 112/114 families would try to use these 2 lifts within a span of 30 minutes.

                The next most critical slot in the mornings is from 8:15 am to 8:45 am when most of the grown-ups leave for office. Visualize the chaos when 112/114 families would try to use these 2 lifts within a span of 30 minutes.

                The builders are normally designing one swimming pool for 2000-2500 flats.
                Assuming that on an average 5 people would stay in one flat, total head count would be 12500.

                Even if half of these decide to use the pool at the same time, they would barley fit inside the pool with not even an inch to move and most of the water in the pool would be displaced by these people

                In my opinion, the ideal no of flats in a GHP should be around 200-250. Anything above this figure is not worth livable as the common facilities like swimming pool, lawns, open space etc would then be shared by a huge no of people and qulaity of these services would hugely suffer.

                So, it is more sensible to buy a flat in a society that was build when there was height restriction in NOIDA and FAR was 2.00 FAR or below. Only in such societies, people can enjoy quality life. In the GHP's that are currentlly on offer, life would be similar to Mumbai's "chawls" with a lot of crowding and fight for common services.

                Prior to 2008:

                50% flats used to be 3 BR (1500+ sq)
                30% used to be 3 BR + SR (1750+ sq ft)
                10% used to be 4BR + SR (2200+ sq ft)
                10% used to be 2 BR (1200+ sq ft)

                In 2009/2010:
                60% flats are 2 BR (850 to 1050 sq ft)
                25% are 3BR (1150-1350 sq ft)
                10-15% are 3R + SR (1450-1650 sq ft)
                0-5% are 4BR + SR (1800-2000 sq ft)

                I am not trying to offend anyone but now the majority of the gentry that would stay in 2009/2010 GHP societies would be more of lower middle class.

                Comment

                • #38

                  #38

                  Re : Noida:New projects, What to do

                  Very valid point sanjeev. Thanks!

                  Comment

                  • #39

                    #39

                    Re : Noida:New projects, What to do

                    Lotus Panache

                    Yes I do agree with the amount of congestion that could be caused using the amenities given by the builders. Because all builders would surely give the facility of various types like Lifts, Swimming pool, Club. The thing that would matter is the Quantity and quality of these amenities.

                    So we should not take things for granted, that every builder is offering same amenities. It should be sensible to keep the above things in mind before choosing a project. I guess these things would make a remarkable difference between and ordinary project and and extra ordinary project.

                    I have checked the 3C Lotus Panache layout. The are providing 2 medium lifts and a Big utility lift (capacity 20 persons, this would help u carry huge luggage and furniture too.)

                    They have a club of 1,35,000 Sq. Ft. This would again do justice the 40 acre area of total project and 3000 families.

                    The are certainly providing more than 2 swimming pool( not sure about exact no and sizes.

                    Has any body looked at their layout and talked to builder about these.

                    Disclaimer : Have booked on with 3c panache.

                    Comment

                    • #40

                      #40

                      Re : Noida:New projects, What to do

                      Originally posted by sanjeevchaudhri View Post
                      Prior to 2008:
                      ===========
                      The FAR for GHP was 2.
                      Height of the building was restricted to 8 stories.

                      Most of the building configuration had maximum of 4 flats per floor and minimum of 2 lifts.

                      Hence the 2 lifts used to cater to a maximum of 28 (7 * 4) flats (assuming gnd floor would not normally use the lifts.

                      The waiting time and congestion for the lifts used to be bearable or non-existent.

                      Scenario now in 2010:
                      ================
                      FAR is 2.75.
                      There is no restriction on height.

                      Builders are now construction minimum of 14 stories and going up-to 25-30 stories with 6 or 8 flats per floor.

                      Consider Amrapali Zodiac:

                      Flats per floor 8.
                      No of stories 15.
                      No of lifts 2.
                      These 2 lifts would cater to (14 * 8) = 112 families.

                      Amrapali Pan Oasis:
                      Flats per floor 6.
                      No of stories 20.
                      No of lifts 2.
                      These 2 lifts would cater to (19 * 6) = 114 families.

                      The most critical time in the mornings is from 7 am to 7:30 am when most of the children leave for school/college. Visualize the chaos when 112/114 families would try to use these 2 lifts within a span of 30 minutes.

                      The next most critical slot in the mornings is from 8:15 am to 8:45 am when most of the grown-ups leave for office. Visualize the chaos when 112/114 families would try to use these 2 lifts within a span of 30 minutes.

                      The builders are normally designing one swimming pool for 2000-2500 flats.
                      Assuming that on an average 5 people would stay in one flat, total head count would be 12500.

                      Even if half of these decide to use the pool at the same time, they would barley fit inside the pool with not even an inch to move and most of the water in the pool would be displaced by these people

                      In my opinion, the ideal no of flats in a GHP should be around 200-250. Anything above this figure is not worth livable as the common facilities like swimming pool, lawns, open space etc would then be shared by a huge no of people and qulaity of these services would hugely suffer.

                      So, it is more sensible to buy a flat in a society that was build when there was height restriction in NOIDA and FAR was 2.00 FAR or below. Only in such societies, people can enjoy quality life. In the GHP's that are currentlly on offer, life would be similar to Mumbai's "chawls" with a lot of crowding and fight for common services.

                      Prior to 2008:

                      50% flats used to be 3 BR (1500+ sq)
                      30% used to be 3 BR + SR (1750+ sq ft)
                      10% used to be 4BR + SR (2200+ sq ft)
                      10% used to be 2 BR (1200+ sq ft)

                      In 2009/2010:
                      60% flats are 2 BR (850 to 1050 sq ft)
                      25% are 3BR (1150-1350 sq ft)
                      10-15% are 3R + SR (1450-1650 sq ft)
                      0-5% are 4BR + SR (1800-2000 sq ft)

                      I am not trying to offend anyone but now the majority of the gentry that would stay in 2009/2010 GHP societies would be more of lower middle class.
                      Hi Sanjeev...You are right upto most extent...same panicness & uncomformtability, i had before buying such a flat...On asking to few of my collegues, who are living in different socities, similar questions about amenities, they told me hardly some one uses a swimming pool, lawns...Its more used for views from balconies, as people leave in the morning & comes back in evening, even in weekends they walk around or sit back at home...this might be wrong...Although, you have made very valid points...no doubt about it...

                      One small correction...
                      I have bought a flat in pan oasis...you mentioned there will be 2 lifts...but its cluster plan shows 2 normal & 1 one service lift (total 3)...plz verify?

                      Comment

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