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Pune 15 years ago

Last updated: October 19 2013
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  • Pune 15 years ago

    I read an article of how Pune wa 15 years ago: It makes interesting reading.Posted just for comparison as to the present stage of Pune.
    1. Aundh, Baner, Wakad, Bavdhan, Warje were villages on the outskirts of Pune.
    2. No one had heard of a village named ‘Hinjewadi’.
    3. Senapati Bapat Road, Jangli Maharaj Road, FC Road didn’t have road dividers.
    4. 14 years back, Pune and Balewadi were getting ready to host the National Games – the roads and the public infrastructure were being nicely spruced up, not unlike what’s being done right now! Sad to say, we had to wait for another 14 years for such an exercise. One wishes that such games happen every year!
    5. Pune airport had less than 5 daily flights.
    6. Pune had only one Five Star Hotel – Blue Diamond (It was not ‘Taj’ Blue Diamond those days)
    7. There were no international fast food chain restaurants.
    8. The best Punjabi and Continental restaurant in town was Hotel Amir’s ‘Peshwa Inn’ near Pune station (This hotel has since been closed down).
    9. Prabhat Road and the greater Deccan Gymkhana area still had many old, nice stone bungalows, many of them built by former ICS and IAS officers. The present day apartment dwellers in this area need to thank all those bungalow owners for the excellent tree cover still enjoyed here.
    10. No one had heard the term ‘InternationalSchool’. Loyola and St. Vincent were amongst ‘the’ schools to go to.
    11. There were only 4/5 engineering colleges (compared with the 20+ today).
    12. Dorabjees, Chitale Bandhu, Vaishali were as popular, as today.
    13. Vaishali Idli Sambar was priced around Rs. 5 and a good snack there for 4 people would run into Rs 60-80.
    14. Amongst the very few places one could order Pizza were, Supreme opposite SambhajiPark and Darshan on Prabhat Road.
    15. The best shopping area was MG Road – there were no malls in Pune.
    16. There were no multiplexes – Alka and Rahul were the popular places for watching Hollywood movies.
    17. A nice water fountain circle stood outside the University main gate. A long line of Chinese and Indian fast-food handcarts occupied the beginning part of Baner Road. This was a popular hangout place.
    18. Most people in Pune had no idea what the term ‘IT’ meant. Few of those who knew would have thought of it to be ‘Income Tax’.
    19. There were no traffic jams (in fact hardly any traffic) on Prabhat Road, Bhandarkar Road and Law College Road.
    20. The only place where traffic jams occurred regularly was Paud Phata – and yes, there was no fly-over.
    21. There were no banks on residential Bhandarkar Road and Apte Road.
    22. Tallest residential buildings in Pune were 3 storeys high.
    23. Deccan Gymkhana and KoregaonPark were the most expensive places to live in (same as today!).
    24. The only IT Company on Senapati Bapat Road was Persistent Systems.
    25. Even back then, Pune was known as a ‘city of bridges’ – notwithstanding the fact that nearly half a dozen new ones have since been added.
    26. When people referred to that big manufacturing company (biggest in Pune even then…) that manufactured trucks, they would have referred to a ‘Telco’.
    27. Fiats were common on the streets; the ‘hip’ cars were 118 NE and Maruti 1000. Kinetic Honda was the most coveted 2 wheeler.
    28. COEP was still known back then as COEP (not withstanding its brief stint a few years back as ‘Pune Institute of Engineering Technology’).
    29. On Paud road, beyond Vanaz Engineering (and the now obsolete Garbage dump) the city ended. Going to Garden Court/Ambrosia felt like you were going to some place well ‘outside’ Pune. And there were none of the dozens of Garden Court clones in the Chandni Chowk area.
    30. The old Pune – Mumbai highway was often choked up with back-to-back traffic…The Expressway, a distant dream.
    31. Even on weekends, it was very easy to find parking on top of the Sinhagad fort.
    32. Bicycles were very common on city roads.
    33. No one knew what ‘Internet’ meant and email was known to very few. General email access was available in less than half a dozen government organizations such as CDAC.
    34. Cell phones and pagers were things that one heard about from friends and relatives in the US/Europe. People really doubted if they would see such things in India in the near future.
    35. Rs. 4000 per month was a very good salary for a graduating engineer from a top college; Rs 7K was considered exceptional and absolutely top of the line.
    36. Back then, a walk through the old Pune ‘Peths’ revealed quite a few remaining ‘Wadas’, once the primary residence structure in Pune. Today, hardly any of them are left, and the ones remaining are in extremely decrepit state.
    37. Durga Puja, Dandiya Ras celebrations were foreign to Pune. Big Dahi Handi celebrations were something that one saw in Mumbai.
    38. Even back then, Pune was the national leader as far as beautiful collegiate crowd from the fairer was concerned. Back then, the teenage boys (and many, if not all men) had a great time enjoying this beauty on strategic places such as FC Road, as the crowd zoomed past on their 2 wheelers. Unfortunately today, with the invention of the ‘wraparound scarf’ it feels like Pune has significantly regressed in this area! Keep aside the security debate for a moment – in the wider interest of the male population, an immediate ban should be passed on this headgear!
    39. Pachwari (5 meter) Saris were commonly seen among middle aged and older women.
    40. Ganpati Celebrations and Immersion Processions were as loud and colorful as today, if a little smaller in scale.
    41. One of the best ways to travel from Pune to Mumbai was via Deccan Queen First Class – and enjoying some great snacks in the dining car. That dining car experience is now sadly gone for ever.
    42. ‘Hindi’ was not commonly heard in restaurants, shops and other public places in Pune. Back then, I used to contend that many non Maharashtrians living in Pune spoke better Marathi than Maharashtrians living in Mumbai!
    43. Few foreign visitors were seen on Pune streets; bulk of them comprised of the Osho commune visitors, in their characteristic garb.
    44. The sobriquet ‘Pensioner’s Paradise’ was commonly used to describe Pune back then…even though the paradise was already showing signs of turning towards the dark side. One hardly hears this name today.
    45. There was at least ‘some’ traffic discipline in Pune. Signals were regularly obeyed. Policemen commanded some respect, and were not beaten up.
    46. Pune television viewers had access to around 5 channels, and they were rejoicing at finally having a choice for the ‘Doordarshan’ channel.
    47. A long standing solution to Pune traffic was being planned back then as well. A popular solution, ironically same as the one being proposed today, was a road along the river banks/over the river!
    48. Back then ‘PMPL’ was referred to as ‘PMT’. Unlike the many modern busses you see today, there were quite a few old ones dating back to 60s and 70s – and those PMT busses had a god given right to breakdown at any busy road/intersection and create a traffic mess.
    49. Punekars were not very well familiar with terms such as ‘Cholesterol’, ‘Thyroid’, etc. Blood tests were something that was done only if you were really really sick or if you were traveling abroad.
    50. Same as today, Ruby Hall (though much smaller than today) was the best hospital in town.
    51. There were hardly any modern ‘gyms’ in town…’Talwalkar’s’ was a pretty popular one amongst the few out there.
    52. There was only one local English daily – Maharashtra Herald. Now taken over by the Sakal group, it has since been re-incarnated as ‘Sakal Times’.
    53. ‘Pune Times’ had been recently launched with much fanfare by Times of India to capture Pune audience. Back then Pune Times had real news items, instead of fancy, racy pictures and page-3 items.
    54. Link tol article https://aparanjape.wordpress.com/200...past-15-years/
  • #2

    #2

    Re : Pune 15 years ago

    Thanks for the sunday morning jog through memory lane. I first came to pune 11 years back and can identify with what is written in the article to a major extent.
    I am surprised to see a new breed of punekars who have never heard of "marz o rin", "budhani waferwala" and think that the "burger king (now renamed as burger)" is just another burger joint ! Hmmph!!

    Comment

    • #3

      #3

      Re : Pune 15 years ago

      Pune 15 years hence

      Past memories give me nostalgia but what about the future?Questions,doubts?
      Some predictions in light hearted manner
      Pune_Mumbai one giant urban agglomeration
      Metro services to many other places
      skyscrapers for residential homes of 30 stories and more
      Tanker supply will stop and PMC will supply water regularly
      Stray dogs will be humanely sterilised and population controlled
      Others could add their wishes.

      Comment

      • #4

        #4

        Re : Pune 15 years ago

        Originally posted by vaibav123 View Post
        I read an article of how Pune wa 15 years ago: It makes interesting reading.Posted just for comparison as to the present stage of Pune.
        1. Aundh, Baner, Wakad, Bavdhan, Warje were villages on the outskirts of Pune.
        2. No one had heard of a village named ‘Hinjewadi’.
        3. Senapati Bapat Road, Jangli Maharaj Road, FC Road didn’t have road dividers.
        4. 14 years back, Pune and Balewadi were getting ready to host the National Games – the roads and the public infrastructure were being nicely spruced up, not unlike what’s being done right now! Sad to say, we had to wait for another 14 years for such an exercise. One wishes that such games happen every year!
        5. Pune airport had less than 5 daily flights.
        6. Pune had only one Five Star Hotel – Blue Diamond (It was not ‘Taj’ Blue Diamond those days)
        7. There were no international fast food chain restaurants.
        8. The best Punjabi and Continental restaurant in town was Hotel Amir’s ‘Peshwa Inn’ near Pune station (This hotel has since been closed down).
        9. Prabhat Road and the greater Deccan Gymkhana area still had many old, nice stone bungalows, many of them built by former ICS and IAS officers. The present day apartment dwellers in this area need to thank all those bungalow owners for the excellent tree cover still enjoyed here.
        10. No one had heard the term ‘InternationalSchool’. Loyola and St. Vincent were amongst ‘the’ schools to go to.
        11. There were only 4/5 engineering colleges (compared with the 20+ today).
        12. Dorabjees, Chitale Bandhu, Vaishali were as popular, as today.
        13. Vaishali Idli Sambar was priced around Rs. 5 and a good snack there for 4 people would run into Rs 60-80.
        14. Amongst the very few places one could order Pizza were, Supreme opposite SambhajiPark and Darshan on Prabhat Road.
        15. The best shopping area was MG Road – there were no malls in Pune.
        16. There were no multiplexes – Alka and Rahul were the popular places for watching Hollywood movies.
        17. A nice water fountain circle stood outside the University main gate. A long line of Chinese and Indian fast-food handcarts occupied the beginning part of Baner Road. This was a popular hangout place.
        18. Most people in Pune had no idea what the term ‘IT’ meant. Few of those who knew would have thought of it to be ‘Income Tax’.
        19. There were no traffic jams (in fact hardly any traffic) on Prabhat Road, Bhandarkar Road and Law College Road.
        20. The only place where traffic jams occurred regularly was Paud Phata – and yes, there was no fly-over.
        21. There were no banks on residential Bhandarkar Road and Apte Road.
        22. Tallest residential buildings in Pune were 3 storeys high.
        23. Deccan Gymkhana and KoregaonPark were the most expensive places to live in (same as today!).
        24. The only IT Company on Senapati Bapat Road was Persistent Systems.
        25. Even back then, Pune was known as a ‘city of bridges’ – notwithstanding the fact that nearly half a dozen new ones have since been added.
        26. When people referred to that big manufacturing company (biggest in Pune even then…) that manufactured trucks, they would have referred to a ‘Telco’.
        27. Fiats were common on the streets; the ‘hip’ cars were 118 NE and Maruti 1000. Kinetic Honda was the most coveted 2 wheeler.
        28. COEP was still known back then as COEP (not withstanding its brief stint a few years back as ‘Pune Institute of Engineering Technology’).
        29. On Paud road, beyond Vanaz Engineering (and the now obsolete Garbage dump) the city ended. Going to Garden Court/Ambrosia felt like you were going to some place well ‘outside’ Pune. And there were none of the dozens of Garden Court clones in the Chandni Chowk area.
        30. The old Pune – Mumbai highway was often choked up with back-to-back traffic…The Expressway, a distant dream.
        31. Even on weekends, it was very easy to find parking on top of the Sinhagad fort.
        32. Bicycles were very common on city roads.
        33. No one knew what ‘Internet’ meant and email was known to very few. General email access was available in less than half a dozen government organizations such as CDAC.
        34. Cell phones and pagers were things that one heard about from friends and relatives in the US/Europe. People really doubted if they would see such things in India in the near future.
        35. Rs. 4000 per month was a very good salary for a graduating engineer from a top college; Rs 7K was considered exceptional and absolutely top of the line.
        36. Back then, a walk through the old Pune ‘Peths’ revealed quite a few remaining ‘Wadas’, once the primary residence structure in Pune. Today, hardly any of them are left, and the ones remaining are in extremely decrepit state.
        37. Durga Puja, Dandiya Ras celebrations were foreign to Pune. Big Dahi Handi celebrations were something that one saw in Mumbai.
        38. Even back then, Pune was the national leader as far as beautiful collegiate crowd from the fairer was concerned. Back then, the teenage boys (and many, if not all men) had a great time enjoying this beauty on strategic places such as FC Road, as the crowd zoomed past on their 2 wheelers. Unfortunately today, with the invention of the ‘wraparound scarf’ it feels like Pune has significantly regressed in this area! Keep aside the security debate for a moment – in the wider interest of the male population, an immediate ban should be passed on this headgear!
        39. Pachwari (5 meter) Saris were commonly seen among middle aged and older women.
        40. Ganpati Celebrations and Immersion Processions were as loud and colorful as today, if a little smaller in scale.
        41. One of the best ways to travel from Pune to Mumbai was via Deccan Queen First Class – and enjoying some great snacks in the dining car. That dining car experience is now sadly gone for ever.
        42. ‘Hindi’ was not commonly heard in restaurants, shops and other public places in Pune. Back then, I used to contend that many non Maharashtrians living in Pune spoke better Marathi than Maharashtrians living in Mumbai!
        43. Few foreign visitors were seen on Pune streets; bulk of them comprised of the Osho commune visitors, in their characteristic garb.
        44. The sobriquet ‘Pensioner’s Paradise’ was commonly used to describe Pune back then…even though the paradise was already showing signs of turning towards the dark side. One hardly hears this name today.
        45. There was at least ‘some’ traffic discipline in Pune. Signals were regularly obeyed. Policemen commanded some respect, and were not beaten up.
        46. Pune television viewers had access to around 5 channels, and they were rejoicing at finally having a choice for the ‘Doordarshan’ channel.
        47. A long standing solution to Pune traffic was being planned back then as well. A popular solution, ironically same as the one being proposed today, was a road along the river banks/over the river!
        48. Back then ‘PMPL’ was referred to as ‘PMT’. Unlike the many modern busses you see today, there were quite a few old ones dating back to 60s and 70s – and those PMT busses had a god given right to breakdown at any busy road/intersection and create a traffic mess.
        49. Punekars were not very well familiar with terms such as ‘Cholesterol’, ‘Thyroid’, etc. Blood tests were something that was done only if you were really really sick or if you were traveling abroad.
        50. Same as today, Ruby Hall (though much smaller than today) was the best hospital in town.
        51. There were hardly any modern ‘gyms’ in town…’Talwalkar’s’ was a pretty popular one amongst the few out there.
        52. There was only one local English daily – Maharashtra Herald. Now taken over by the Sakal group, it has since been re-incarnated as ‘Sakal Times’.
        53. ‘Pune Times’ had been recently launched with much fanfare by Times of India to capture Pune audience. Back then Pune Times had real news items, instead of fancy, racy pictures and page-3 items.
        54. Link tol article https://aparanjape.wordpress.com/200...past-15-years/
        As someone that moved to Pune in 1993 (was in 7th standard then) - can completely identify with this Pune of old and feeling so nostalgic now!!

        Comment

        • #5

          #5

          Re : Pune 15 years ago

          I was born in Pune and like many other friends and relatives miss the peace and tranquility of what was once a dream city . Transition started from the year 2000 , but rapid deterioration and mass migration started from 2005 to the extent that when I came back to Pune after spending few years outside , I could not recognise my old city . Had the development been planned and we would have created number of smaller cities instead of bustling metroes if would have really aided to development of people from all parts of the state .
          Todays Pune , may have aided malls,restaturants,star hotels and other so called amenities it has already started missing the old fabric of the city .
          The only talk all around these days is about money and just about everybody wants to invest in real estate ... Just met somebody in my society - this guys wise father is from MP and they are selling their ancestral home to buy a flat and settle in Pune - the reason being this guy has got a job in IBM Pune!!!

          Comment

          • #6

            #6

            Re : Pune 15 years ago

            Top 10 Cities in Maharashtra


            Located in the western part of the Indian subcontinent, Mahsrastra is surrounded by Arabian Sea, Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh and the Union territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli. The vast state of Maharashtra owes its growth and development to its cities. The third largest state of India is the home of many important cities of not only of Mahasratra but also of India. The cities, mainly the top 10 cities in Mahasrastra play an important part in making what the world know of Maharashtra.


            List of Top 10 Cities in Mahasrastra

            The following is a detailed list on the top 10 cities in Mahrastra.
            Mumbai
            The capital city of Maharashtra, Mumbai, is fondly known as the ‘city that never sleeps’. This fast moving city of India is also the commercial, financial as well as entertainment capital of the country. Mumbai is one of those cities of India which is known for its historical significance, it is a city of varied cultural heritage. Owing to its historical significance, Mumbai has numerous places of tourist interst. The city is originally made of seven islands.

            Pune
            Commonly known as the ‘Queen of Deccan’, Pune is the second most important city of Maharashtra after Mumbai. The ‘Oxford of the East’, Pune is famous as one of the historically significant cities of the country. Lakes, hills make the cultural capital of Maharashtra one of the important tourist destinations of India. The city is also known for being the greenest city in India. Pune has undergone a remarkable transformation and is slowly emerging as major city in India.

            Nagpur
            Nagpur enjoys a strategic location in the central part of India and is an important city of industrial importance. Owing to the fact that Pune houses some of the leading and famous companies, businessmen from all over the country throng to this city. Nagpur is sometimes dubbed as the ‘second capital’ of state of Maharashtra and is known for dealing with high quality oranges.

            Thane
            Located in Northeast of Mumbai on the Salsette Island, Thane is also known as the ‘Cacade de Tana’. This uptown suburb of the capital Mumbai accommodates huge number of chemical, textile and engineering industries. In addition, the various buildings that reflect the history of the city, with forts and churches make Thane an important city of Maharashtra.

            Nashik
            The busy city of Nashik, is a perfect blend of the old and the new. Among other things, Nashik is famous the production of highest range of vegetables and fruits. Shirdi is one of the most important and popular pilgrim sites of India, which attracts large crowds. Considered as holiest cities of Hinduism in the world, Nashik, hosts the famous ‘Kumbhmela’ once in 12 years.

            Mahabaleshwar
            Far from the madding crowd, Mahabaleshwar is an important hill station of Maharashtra. This pollution free city is top most hill station located in the Western Ghats in Maharashtra. The city is known for its tranquility and serenity, it is mostly visited by the people of Maharashtra and is a popular destination for the honeymooners.

            Solapur
            Situated near the Karnataka border, Solapur, is important for its religious and historical significance. The leader in cotton mills as well as power looms, Solapur, is the connecting city between Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

            Ratnagiri
            A port city, Ratnagiri is one of the most beautiful cities of Maharashtra. The birthplace of the renowned freedom fighter of India, Bal Gangadhar Tilak, Ratnagiri is famous for the ruins of temples. Ratnagiri makes an abundant production of fruits, the famous Alphonso mangoes, coconuts, rice and cashew nuts. Additionally, fishing industry plays a major role in the economy of Ratnagiri.

            Kolhapur
            Located in the south-west part of Maharashtra on the banks of Panchgani River, the culture of Kolhapur is striking different from the rest of surrounding cities. Mostly based on agriculture, Kolhapur, is center of art, sports, education and industry of Maharashtra. Kolhapur is also famous as the capital of the film industry of Maharashtra.

            Amravati
            Situated in the northeastern part of Maharashtra, Amravati, is the haven for wildlife, from wild animals like tiger, wild deer, crocodile, neelgai, bison, migratory birds and many more, everything is found in abundance in Amravati. The city is also religiously significant; it is the home of the temples of Goddess Amba, Shri Venkateshwara and Lord Krishna.

            source; Top 10 Cities in Maharashtra

            hope Pune iremains 2nd position ...

            savvy_v

            Comment

            • #7

              #7

              Re : Pune 15 years ago

              I visited Pune in Jan 1993 for some office work. Yes IT was just beginning to take off and we were located in a office in Chincwad stp. Persistent was a small office doing some custom work for Microsoft. Aundh was sleepy suburb and after 8:PM it was dark. I was waiting to get back to Mumbai . Now both cities have gone to the dogs

              Comment

              • #8

                #8

                Re : Pune 15 years ago

                Loved pune back then and love it even more today. So many educated folks earning money the legit way and parents very keen that their kids get good education means only one thing - prosperity for a long time to come.

                The traffic may have gone up, pollution may have gone up, prices may have gone up but so have opportunities to earn, spend, enjoy and relax. Only if we can get the power, road and water issues sorted but privatizing them

                Comment

                • #9

                  #9

                  Re : Pune 15 years ago

                  I want the best of both. I like the peace that was then , but I was poor as compare to others then.

                  Now that I have better living standard, I wish for better traffic , peace etc.

                  Not sure if things will improve.

                  Wish I could really have the best of both!

                  Comment

                  • #10

                    #10

                    Re : Pune 15 years ago

                    You wont believe on a different note!

                    While most of us think how landscape has deteriorated, to our surprise and for those who know parvati area.

                    The green cover has actually increased!!

                    Comment

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