People normally look at the saleable area indicated by the builders and do not really work out and check up the carpet area from the floor plans. A builder selling a flat of 1500 sq. ft. with a carpet area of say 70%, i.e., 1050 sq. ft. as compared to another builder who sells 1400 sq. ft. with a carpet area of 75% also will come to 1050 sq. ft. We should rather compare on the rate arrived at on the carpet area/sq.ft of the buildings and select/decide. Afterall, the carpet area is the real floor area availble for the buyer to live in the flat. wiseman, nataraj and other active members may give further guidance to other members.

ks2071746
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  • Originally Posted by abk
    look at my posts again.the plinth area is the actual area you own exclusively
    which is your moneys worth. the carpet area is subject to design as i said a 1000 sq ft 2 bhk will have more carpet area then a 3bhk 1000 sq ft flat both with the same plinth area.
    now tell me why you will look at carpet area rather than plinth area.
    the bigger the size of the flat with bigger rooms will have more % of carpet area than smaller flats.
    a 850 sq ft 2BHK will have less % of carpet area than a 1300 sq ft 2bhk.whereas if the common area is same the plinth area % would be same.


    I am not talking about the quality of construction .it is simple we need to compare any two things on a parameter which is equal or normalised for both.
    as i have told carpet area is a variable which is subject to design or plan of the house.
    wheras the plinth area is the area handed over to you which is the value for the money you paid.
    consider this a 10 X 10 room 100 sq ft has 40 feet of wall(perimeter)
    whereas the same 100 sq ft if built as 20 X 5 will have 5o feet of wall(perimeter) so more wall space for same area enclosed.
    this is what will mislead you if you compare carpet area.
    it is upto you th choose a good design,but the value for money is plinth area.
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  • Originally Posted by ks2071746
    Dear friend,

    When I talk about carpet area, it is to be seen coupled with usability and should have reasonable areas for the halls, bed room, kitchen, toilet etc. A very big hall with small bed rooms or kitchen or vice versa is not what I am talking about. For example, it we take a 1400 sq. ft. flat, assuming a carpet area of say about 1000-1050 sq. ft. ( for this flat, the typical areas can be:
    1. Living hall approx. 200 sq. ft.
    2. Dining hall 120 sq. ft.
    3. Kitchen 100 sq. ft.
    4. Bed I 150 sq. ft.
    5. Bed II 130 sq. ft.
    6. Bed III 120 sq. ft.
    7. Balcony 40 sq. ft. one for kitchen, one for hall or one each for 2 bed rooms.
    8. Balance for 3 toilets.
    Don't you feel, this will be a fairly good configuration from utility point of view.

    ks2071746

    What you are saying is fine. I aint talking about that alone. I am talking about DESIGN. So if you have both your bedrooms on one side of the hall that is different from one bedroom on either side. There are many such special features.
    Infact buying a house is not an easy vocation. Very often you must be lucky to hit the right one. Unfortunately many dont even care about it. They buy based on pure numbers. Numbers are good to evaluate the approximate worth but not the actual price. For example in a 40 feet road the same flat has a higher worth than on a 20ft road. Why?
    Usability.
    Usability is a feature that cant be discussed in one line, it needs one to plan his thoughts before the act. So if you dont look at the plan and find out if it fits your WAY OF LIFE, you might end up in pain.
    Ofcourse all these comments are meant for decent flats not for a two bedroom built in 600sqft where it is at best a rat hole.
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  • Dear friend,

    What you have explained is also true and to be considered while deciding a flat buy.

    ks2071746:)
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  • Thank you friends

    Dear friends,

    Its really useful discussion ..thanks a lot...
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  • Excel Utility

    Hi
    I have created a simple utility in MS Excel whereby you can enter the dimensions of the room and it calculates the carpet area and compares with the super area.

    Please provide your feedback.

    Prabal

    see attachment: areas.zip --> areas.xlsx
    Attachments:
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  • Originally Posted by prabal
    Hi
    I have created a simple utility in MS Excel whereby you can enter the dimensions of the room and it calculates the carpet area and compares with the super area.

    Please provide your feedback.

    Prabal

    see attachment: areas.zip --> areas.xlsx


    thanx prabal.
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  • Hey,

    Just a question.

    When builder says 1050 sqft apartment, is it a salable area or a carpet area?
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  • Originally Posted by nikhilraj
    Hey,

    Just a question.

    When builder says 1050 sqft apartment, is it a salable area or a carpet area?


    By default they mean SUPER area. If its carpet area they will mention very clearly.
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  • In India, flats are sold on Super Built Up area, which is also called as Saleable area.

    Super built up area is an imaginary mumber, does not mean anything. In music system, there is a term called PMPO ... like 5000 Watt PMPO. This marketing number is just at the whim of the builder.

    So look practically. What you need to do is, identify the key areas in your flat, like bed rooms, hall, dinning area, kitchen. Exclude all not important areas like balconies, receses, corners, dead ends, passages.

    Now calculate the carpet areas of key areas only. Calculate Total Cost / Key Carpet Area and then compare different project.

    The above calculation depends on you as some of the things are very subjective ... how you define a key area. Balcony may be a key area to someone and someone it is sheer wastage of space.

    Total Cost / Key Carpet Area is the right way to compare cost A'pple to A'pple.
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  • Pay for the area that you get

    TNS


    Area specifications that decide the total cost of an apartment are nothing less than a puzzle for a first time home buyer. The developers quote the per sq ft price for an apartment and the total area is mentioned initially, but while finalising the deal many buyers find that they have been made to pay for area that they actually do not possess. So this makes a good deal turn into an expensive one. It is important to know about the difference between super area, built up area and carpet area to avoid overpaying for your house.

    Points of difference

    Actually there are three different terms that the builders may use while calculating the cost of a residential unit. These are — super area, built up area and carpet area. For any customer understanding built up area is easier as this is the area which is under the possession of the customer. Built up area means the entire area enclosed by its peripheral walls, including area under walls, area under columns, half of the area of the wall common with the other apartment, area of plumbing / electric shafts of the said apartment, total areas of all balconies and cupboards and 50 per cent area of open terrace attached, if any, which forms integral part of the said apartment.

    Super area means the built up area plus the proportionate area used under common services and facilities like corridors, staircase, lift well, electrical panel and DG rooms etc

    The general practice in the real estate sector that is used while selling property

    If we talk about the NCR region then most of the builders use super area for calculating the cost of a property. But for buyers the built up area deal is the right deal.

    Relation between loading and these areas

    Loading is that proportionate common area that is added to the built-up area to get the super area. Many developers don’t declare the exact loading and mention vague figures like loading of 20 to 30 per cent and the buyer never comes to know how much extra he is paying on hidden loading. The buyers should see that the developer is mentioning an exact and firm loading irrespective of the size of the flat. Like in our case we maintain an exact loading of 20 per cent is maintained in all the sizes of the flats.

    Disadvantages of buying on super area basis

    The chances of overcharging and fleecing are more in this as it is only the developer and his architect who know the exact dimensions and thus there is no transparency for the buyer. So the customer can never imagine or challenge the disparity in the area booked and the area delivered to him.

    Benefits of buying at built-up area basis

    Anyone can easily measure it with just the help of a measuring tape and geometrical calculations. So the customer is sure that he will get what he is actually buying and he is paying for the area that he is actually going to use. So the pricing is more fair in such a case.
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  • Originally Posted by MANOJa


    Disadvantages of buying on super area basis

    The chances of overcharging and fleecing are more in this as it is only the developer and his architect who know the exact dimensions and thus there is no transparency for the buyer. So the customer can never imagine or challenge the disparity in the area booked and the area delivered to him.

    Benefits of buying at built-up area basis

    Anyone can easily measure it with just the help of a measuring tape and geometrical calculations. So the customer is sure that he will get what he is actually buying and he is paying for the area that he is actually going to use. So the pricing is more fair in such a case.


    Thank you for posting this explanation as I have not bought in India before.

    I am used to seeing floor space shown as a measurement of internal usable area. (Standard in Europe) The property will clearly be bigger externally than the quoted floor space.

    If I am looking at a property, built up area is a more transparent way of comparing potential purchases?
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